Great Washington Museums: Corcoran Gallery of Art

Great Washington Museums Celebrate Great Women Artists is a NMWA-organized collaborative city-wide project highlighting works by women artists. During 2012, institutions throughout the Washington area are featuring an array of signature works by women artists that have enriched their distinguished collections. This landmark program, in conjunction with NMWA’s 25th anniversary celebration, continues NMWA’s dedication to celebrating women’s achievements in the visual, performing, and literary arts. This excerpt explores one of the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s signature works by a woman artist, Joan Mitchell’s Salut Tom. Visit www.nmwa.org and download the pdf map to begin your journey!

Joan Mitchell, Salut Tom, 1979; Oil on canvas, 111 x 316 in.; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gift of the Women’s Committee of the Corcoran Gallery of Arts with the aid of funds from the National Endowment for the Arts

Joan Mitchell, Salut Tom, 1979; Oil on canvas, 111 x 316 in.; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Gift of the Women’s Committee of the Corcoran Gallery of Arts with the aid of funds from the National Endowment for the Arts

The origin of Salut Tom, one of Joan Mitchell’s largest and most important paintings, is the view of the river Seine from her estate in Vérheuil, France, where the French Impressionist Claude Monet lived in the 1870s. Motivated by her mental image as well as the actual landscape, Mitchell redrew and repainted the scene many times, displacing the factual traces of her subject with abstract ruminations. Although she consistently denied being influenced by Monet, it is difficult not to compare Salut Tom to the French artist’s multi-panel vistas of water lilies. On view throughout 2012.

Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 Seventeenth St.,  NW; www.corcoran.org