Art Fix Friday: May 10, 2019

Former NMWA Fresh Talk speaker Carolyn Cocca reviews a new comic series featuring Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, which centers “a person who has overcome great odds to stand up for justice, equality, and hope.”

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gets the comic book treatment; Images (L to R): Joe Benitez; Joel Herrera; Joe Benitez

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gets the comic book treatment; Images (L to R): Joe Benitez; Joel Herrera; Joe Benitez

New Party, Who Dis? may have 23 co-creators who are mostly male, but Cocca praises the series as it “names and satirizes the kinds of oppressive dog whistles that undermine imagining marginalized peoples as superheroes and leaders.”

Front-Page Femmes

Norma Miller, the “Queen of Swing” who made the Lindy Hop a Jazz Age craze, has died at 99.

Artsy profiles Leonora Carrington and how she brought a feminist intensity to Surrealist painting.

City Lab looks at the influence of architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky, the first Austrian women architect and designer of the pioneering Frankfurt Kitchen.

Hyperallergic takes a deep dive into parenting and labor in the art world, noting, “It is long past time for museum leadership…to publicly support better workplace policies for everyone.”

Illustration of Amy Sherald by Lauren Tamaki; Photo courtesy of The Cut

Illustration of Amy Sherald by Lauren Tamaki; Photo courtesy of The Cut

Philadelphia’s Gayborhood is getting a new mural by Amy Sherald; Sherald recently spoke to The Cut about life after painting Michelle Obama.

MOCA Los Angeles has named Mia Locks as senior curator and head of new initiatives and announced it will not hire a chief curator to replace Helen Molesworth, who was fired last year.

Curator and social media guru Kimberly Drew shares her Frieze New York schedule.

artnet reviews French artist Laure Prouvost’s “standout exhibition” at the Venice Biennale.

Deborah Dugan has been named  president of the Grammy Awards/Recording Academy—she is the first female leader in the organization’s 64-year history.

Hyperallergic interviews photographer Nydia Blas about the “Black feminine lens” that sets her apart.

Shows We Want to See

At the New-York Historical Society, Augusta Savage: Renaissance Womanhighlights over 50 sculptures, photos, and letters that detail Savage’s influence as an overlooked artist, activist and educator, a trailblazer of African American arts from the Great Depression to the postwar period.”

Augusta Savage viewing two of her sculptures, Susie Q and Truckin, 1939; Photo courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Augusta Savage viewing two of her sculptures, Susie Q and Truckin, 1939; Photo courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

At the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Maria Lassing: Ways of Being “features more than 200 loaned artworks, with key pieces including her last self-portrait, Selbstporträt mit Pinsel. In addition to her paintings and drawings, the survey is remarkable for presenting a large selection of her films and sculptures, including works that have never been shown before.”

Women Artists in Europe from the Monarchy to Modernism is on view at the Dallas Museum of Art until June 9. The exhibition highlights the DMA’s holdings of artwork by female artists working in Europe between the late 18th and early 20th centuries, including Elisabeth Vigée-LeBrun, Rosa Bonheur, and Käthe Kollwitz.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.