Art Fix Friday: October 18, 2019

Opening tomorrow at the Broad Museum, Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again is the largest exhibition to date of the acclaimed artist’s 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition presents more than 230 photographs and eight immersive video installations. It offers a rare glimpse into Neshat’s artistic journey, exploring topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace.

Shirin Neshat, Land of Dreams video still, 2019; Photo courtesy of the Broad Museum

Shirin Neshat, Land of Dreams video still, 2019; Photo courtesy of the Broad Museum

The Art Newspaper interviews Neshat about the power of political satire and the similarities she has observed between Iran and the U.S.

Front Page Femmes

For the first time in almost 30 years, Booker Prize judges broke their own rules and awarded the literary prize to two recipients: Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo.

Artsy remembers British Surrealist artist Ithell Colquhoun, who used themes of the occult to explore gender within her artwork.

The New Yorker reviews Rosine Mbakam’s first documentary feature, The Two Faces of a Bamiléké Woman, which “reveal[s] Mbakam to be one of the foremost filmmakers of creative nonfiction.”

Artnet News interviews Turner Prize nominee Tai Shani about the prohibitive costs and inaccessibility of performance art.

Joanna Wells, Study of Fanny Eaton, 1861; On view in Pre-Raphaelite Sisters at the National Portrait Gallery, London; Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund

Joanna Wells, Study of Fanny Eaton, 1861; On view in Pre-Raphaelite Sisters at the National Portrait Gallery, London; Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund

London’s National Portrait Gallery has opened Pre-Raphaelite Sisters, which highlights the contributions of women associated with the movement as artists, models, and family. “I would like to re-write the narrative of the Pre-Raphaelite women being exploited,” said curator Jan Marsh in an Artnet News interview.

The New York Times remembers pioneering animator Lotte Reiniger, who, during her 60-year career, made more than 70 films out of hand-cut paper silhouettes.

Hyperallergic profiles 98-year-old artist Luchita Hurtado and looks closely at her solo exhibition I Live I Die I Will Be Reborn, currently on view at London’s Serpentine Gallery.

The Guardian profiles the Museum of Modern Art’s $450 million renovation and collection reinstallation ahead of its October 21 reopening; the new installation spotlights artworks by women and artists of color.

The New Yorker profiles Joni Mitchell and her new book, Morning Glory on the Vine, a collection of early poems and drawings.

Feminist icon Gloria Steinem honored Judy Chicago at the Hammer Museum’s Gala in the Garden.

ARTnews interviews Seoul-based multimedia artist Minouk Lim about censorship and marginalization in the art world.

Shows We Want to See

Opening today at the Monnaie de Paris, Kiki Smith features more than 100 of the artist’s works. The exhibition reflects major themes, such as the female figure, that have reoccurred in Smith’s practice and the wide variety of mediums she has explored.

Kiki Smith, Rapture, 2011; Photo by Richard Max-Tremblay; © Kiki Smith, courtesy of Pace Gallery

Kiki Smith, Rapture, 2011; Photo by Richard Max-Tremblay; © Kiki Smith, courtesy of Pace Gallery

Pat Steir: Color Wheel opens October 24 at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The installation of new paintings will create an immersive color wheel around the perimeter of the museum’s second-floor galleries. ARTnews interviewed Steir in July while she prepared for the exhibition.

Adriana Corral: Unearthed/Desenterrado is open at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. Corral’s minimalist sculptural work explores the concept of human rights through work that addresses current and historic rights violations.

—Hannah Southern is the fall 2019 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.