Art Fix Friday: June 7, 2019

At the Serpentine Galleries in London, artist and activist Faith Ringgold has just opened her first solo show at a European institution.

Faith Ringgold's painting American People Series #20: Die was made in 1967, the year of widespread race riots across the U.S. It is Ringgold’s response to Picasso’s Guernica and features a 15 figures--both black and white people--with arms and legs akimbo and shocked looks on their faces, some covered in blood, some holding knifes and guns, some running, and some protecting one another.

Ringgold’s painting American People Series #20: Die was made in 1967, the year of widespread race riots across the U.S. It is Ringgold’s response to Picasso’s Guernica. “I just wanted the riots, the hate, the violence to end,” she said. Courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, New York © 2018 Faith Ringgold/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Featuring works from the past 50 years, the survey includes paintings, story quilts and political posters made during the Black Power movement, including one advocating to free activist Angela Davis. In an interview with The Art Newspaper, Ringgold said, “My paintings are about the American story, and it needs to be told.”

Front-Page Femmes

Hyperallergic looks at a recent study that shows that artists in 18 major U.S. museums are 85% white and 87% male; artist Mona Chalabi illustrates the data in her Who Are You Here to See? series.

Verna Hart, whose paintings were moving visual tributes to jazz music, has died at age 58.

Camille Billops, whose pioneering documentary films fearlessly and powerfully addressed difficult histories, has died at age 85.

Dazed highlights eight female artists who should be as celebrated as their artist partners—including Lee Krasner, Jo Hopper, Ana Mendieta, and Lola Álvarez Bravo, among others.

For the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising in Manhattan, photographer Collier Schorr will present a new commission in partnership with the Stonewall Forever project.

Leah Chase, the “Queen of Creole Cuisine” and collector of African American art, has died at age 96. She showed works by Elizabeth Catlett and Jacob Lawrence at her legendary New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase and served on the board of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

A portrait of Leah Chase from Brian Lanker's 1988 photo series I Dream a World, in which she stands smiling in her chef coat and apron in the middle of a French Quarter street with her hands posed on her hips. The shot is taken from close to ground level.

Leah Chase, in an image from Brian Lanker’s 1988 photo series I Dream a World, in the collection of the New Orleans Museum of Art; © Brian Lanker Archive

artnet published an excerpt of an interview with Jenny Holzer about language, part of Hauser & Wirth’s new publication for Art Basel 2019, Conversations With Contemporary Artists.

The world’s first permanent public artwork dedicated to transgender women will be dedicated to two pioneers of the gay liberation movement—Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

Hyperallergic interviews Shu Lea Cheang about her solo exhibition at the Venice Biennale, which questions the legal and visual regimes that shape gender and sexual norms; she is the first woman artist to represent Taiwan at the Biennale.

The Art Newspaper interviews Dominique Levy, co-founder of the Lévy Gorvy gallery, about her path to success and the art world’s current focus on women artists.

Show We Want to See

At the Newark Museum in New Jersey, Wendy Red Star: A Scratch on the Earth is the museum’s first solo exhibition featuring a Native American artist. The “impressively tight and consistent show” of just 40 works highlights the Crow Nation artist’s “timeless lesson that matters of government policy are also matters of people’s lives.” The exhibition closes on June 16.

Wendy Red Star’s Um-basax-bilua, ‘Where They Make the Noise’ 1904–2016 is a timeline of historical images of Native Americans and the artist’s personal photographs, arranged in a 130-foot-long installation and annotated by the artist in pencil.

Wendy Red Star’s Um-basax-bilua, ‘Where They Make the Noise’ 1904–2016 is a timeline of historical images and the artist’s personal photographs, arranged in a 130-foot-long installation and annotated by the artist in pencil; Photo courtesy of The Newark Museum

At the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel will open on June 9. Alongside new sculptural works created for the exhibition, Au Naturel features some of Lucas’s most important projects, including early sculptures from the 1990s that substitute domestic furniture for human body parts and enlarged tabloid spreads from the same period that reflect objectified representations of the female body.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 31, 2019

At the Barbican Art Gallery in London, Lee Krasner: Living Colour has opened. The Guardian calls it a “thrilling major retrospective” that includes nearly 100 works—early self-portraits, Krasner’s “Little Image” paintings from the 1940s, collages created from torn-up earlier works, and her most impressive large-scale abstract paintings.

Left: Lee Krasner ca. 1938; Photographer unknown; Right: Lee Krasner, Prophecy, 1956; Photo courtesy of The Jewish Museum

Krasner shines in this exhibition, outside of the shadow of her husband Jackson Pollock and the battles she faced throughout her career. “It was…tough to be a woman artist amid the first generation of abstract expressionists…but Krasner kept going, still finding her way.”

Front-Page Femmes

Shirin Neshat will debut a new film on cultural identity at the Broad Museum in October; it will complement her survey at the museum, Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again.

Claire Bessède has been appointed director of Paris’s Eugène Delacroix National Museum.

The Brooklyn Museum has acquired Constance P. Beaty’s portrait of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Hyperallergic profiles the FEMMEBIT Festival in Los Angeles, which features innovative tech art from at least 75 women artists, as well as talks, screenings, and performances.

Lincoln Center Theater and the Metropolitan Opera will develop a new chamber opera based on Lynn Nottage’s popular play Intimate Apparel, opening February 2020.

Portrait of Mary Sully; © Collection of Philip J. Deloria

The Art Newspaper reviews Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists at the Minneapolis Museum of Art, which includes three triptychs from Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully on display for the first time—possibly ever.

The Getty Research Institute has named Naoko Takahatake as its new curator of prints and drawings.

Frieze profiles Eleanor Antin, whose monographic exhibition at LACMA confronts aging and grief in a re-enactment of her groundbreaking 1972 project CARVING: A Traditional Sculpture.

Architect Liz Diller and architectural photographer Hélène Binet have been awarded the 2019 Jane Drew and Ada Louise Huxtable Prizes, respectively.

Colossal profiles painter Laura Berger, who has grown her presence as a fine artist and fostered creative partnerships for products like greeting cards, calendars, and wallpaper.

Shows We Want to See

Suzanne Lacy: We Are Here is the first major retrospective of the artist’s 50-year career and is on view at two San Francisco-based arts institutions simultaneously: the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. The SFMOMA presentation tells a broad and rich history of her feminist art, while the YBCA showcases her community organizing projects. Lacy has “worked tirelessly to address social issues such as feminism, violence against women, racism and labor rights for nearly five decades.”

Judy Chicago, Birth Trinity, 1985; © Judy Chicago/Artists Rights Society, NY

Judy Chicago: The Birth Project from New Mexico Collections opens at the Harwood Museum of Art on June 2. The exhibition includes large-scale needle works, drawings, and prints that all celebrate the birth process, from the painful to the mythical. “This is a moment when the world is belatedly recognizing Chicago’s art and when the debate on women’s control over their own bodies is current, again,” said art writer and activist Lucy Lippard.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 24, 2019

Artsy reports that at last week’s Christie’s, Sotheby’s, and Phillips day sales, “a total of 58 works by living female artists outperformed their high estimates—setting auction records for 13 of the artists, four of whom had never had works sell at auction before.”

Pre-show estimates placed French artist Julie Curtis’s Princess (2006) in the $6,000–$8,000 range, but it sold for a whopping $85,000; Amy Sherald’s Innocent You, Innocent Me (2016) sold for $280,000—more than double its $120,000 estimate

Pre-show estimates placed French artist Julie Curtis’s Princess (2006) in the $6,000–$8,000 range, but it sold for a whopping $85,000; Amy Sherald’s Innocent You, Innocent Me (2016) sold for $280,000—more than double its $120,000 estimate

Rather than attribute the positive performances to a trend, Rebekah Bowling of Phillips points out that these women are great contemporary artists who are pushing the boundaries of their mediums, and who have plenty of support from institutions and collectors.

Front-Page Femmes

Contemporary Indian artist Nalini Malani has won the 2019 Joan Miró Prize, which comes with $77,000 and a solo exhibition that will open at the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona in 2020.

French-Senegalese filmmaker Mati Diop is making history as the first black women to compete at the Cannes Film Festival with her feature Atlantics.

Beibei Fan joins Sotheby’s as the new managing director of China.

Landscape architect Kathryn Gustafson has been selected to create a new park surrounding the Eiffel Tower ahead of the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris.

Aïda Muluneh, The Departure; Photo courtesy of The Atlantic

Aïda Muluneh, The Departure; Photo courtesy of The Atlantic

The Atlantic profiles Ethiopian photographer Aïda Muluneh, her vibrant images that resist the visual clichés of Africa, and her new photo festival that “aspires to shape a new vision of the continent.”

Vogue India celebrates the women who are taking center stage at the Venice Biennale—including 17 women curator-and-artist teams representing their countries in the national pavilions.

The Washington Post looks at how the National Cartoonist Society Festival, one of the biggest events in comic arts, aims to better represent women.

National Book Award winner Elizabeth Acevedo speaks to The Atlantic about her new novel and the diverse writers who are broadening the young-adult fiction genre—which is changing slowly, but surely.

Hyperallergic reviews States of Focus at Poland’s Wrocław Contemporary Museum, calling it “a powerful testimony to contemporary women artists who have endured and continue to endure assaults on their self-determination.”

Shows We Want to See

Huguette Caland, Bribes de corps, 1973; Photo courtesy of Huguette Caland

Huguette Caland, Bribes de corps, 1973; Photo courtesy of Huguette Caland

Lebanese artist Huguette Caland’s first U.K. solo exhibition opens today at Tate St Ives. Caland’s colorful, large-scale paintings and detailed drawings from the 1970s and 1980s “offer a delicate balance between the suggestive and the explicit.” Overlooked for most of her career, the 88-year-old artist has enjoyed recent recognition.

Actress Tilda Swinton has organized her first exhibition at New York City’s Aperture Foundation. Opening today, Orlando features work by 11 photographers that explore the themes of identity and transformation in Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel of the same name and the 1992 film adaptation that starred Swinton.

At the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., Ranjani Shettar: Earth Songs for a Night Sky features hand-carved wood sculptures and a multi-part piece that wraps up the gallery walls. The project was conceived in dialogue with Wassily Kandinsky’s artist’s book Klänge (Sounds) and Paul Klee’s late paintings that are part of the Phillips’s collection.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 17, 2019

Ten years after her death—and after years of copyright limbo—more than 100 of Vivian Maier’s photographs will be available to British collectors for the first time at Photo London, May 16–19.

Vivian Maier’s Chicago (1962) posthumously printed, will go on sale at Photo London; Photo © Estate of Vivian Maier; Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery

Vivian Maier’s Chicago (1962) posthumously printed, will go on sale at Photo London; Photo © Estate of Vivian Maier; Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery

Maier’s body of work was discovered at a Chicago auction in 2007 when a local historian bought the contents of a repossessed storage locker and found a treasure trove of Maier’s photographs from the 1950s to 1970s. There is no evidence she showed her images to anyone. At Photo London, Maier’s photographs—printed posthumously from original negatives—are priced from $5,000 to $6,500.

Front-Page Femmes

A new report reveals that women now dominate Canada’s most powerful visual arts jobs, including four of the five director positions in major art galleries from Vancouver to Halifax.

On May 14, the elusive pseudonymous artist Lutz Bacher died of a heart attack in New York City. Her conceptual work explored “sexuality, power, and violence through politically charged juxtapositions of text and image.”

artnet examines how three North American museums are deaccessioning works to diversify their collections.

The National Gallery of London’s new Artemisia Gentileschi masterpiece began its unconventional tour of the U.K., where it will appear in doctor’s offices, schools, and offices.

Muslim Sisterhood co-founders Lamisa Khan, Zeinab Saleh, and Sara Gulamali; Photo courtesy of Muslim Sisterhood

Muslim Sisterhood co-founders Lamisa Khan, Zeinab Saleh, and Sara Gulamali; Photo courtesy of Muslim Sisterhood

A new documentary by artist Prune Nourry detailing her battle with breast cancer is co-produced by Angelina Jolie and Darren Aronofsky.

Artsy explores why, and how, female artists have used the self-portrait to demand their place in art history.

The London-based art collective Muslim Sisterhood seeks to “represent ‘normal’ Muslim girls who aren’t bloggers, fashionistas or Bake Off winners.”

Nan Goldin teams up with Catherine Deneuve and Isabelle Huppert for a photography show—Versailles-Visible/Invisible—at the famed French palace.

Dia Art Foundation Director Jessica Morgan is breaking open the (male) canon of post-war art and leading the organization into a diverse future.

A scholar claims to have cracked the code of a mysterious Medieval manuscript, which describes women struggling to bathe unruly children. The academic believes that Dominican nuns compiled the manuscript as a source of reference for Maria of Castile, Queen of Aragon.

Shows We Want to See

Rina Banerjee, Take me, take me, take me...to the Palace of love, 2003; Plastic, antique Anglo-Indian Bombay dark wood chair, steel and copper framework, floral picks, foam balls, cowry shells, quilting pins, red colored moss, antique stone globe, glass, synthetic fabric, shells, fake birds; 13 x 13 x 18 ft.; Courtesy of artist, RB Storage, NYC

Rina Banerjee, Take me, take me, take me…to the Palace of love, 2003; Plastic, antique Anglo-Indian Bombay dark wood chair, steel and copper framework, floral picks, foam balls, cowry shells, quilting pins, red colored moss, antique stone globe, glass, synthetic fabric, shells, fake birds; 13 x 13 x 18 ft.; Courtesy of artist, RB Storage, NYC

At the San Jose Museum of Art, Rina Banerjee: Make Me a Summary of the World presents almost 20 years of the artist’s large-scale installations, sculptures, and paintings. Banerjee tackles important issues of our time including immigration and identity; the lasting effects of colonialism and its relationship to globalization; feminism; and climate change.

At the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Kim Gordon: Lo-Fi Glamour is the artist’s first North American museum solo exhibition, featuring painting, sculpture, a new series of figure drawings, and a commissioned score for Andy Warhol’s 1963–64 silent film Kiss.

Opening May 18 at the Honolulu Museum of Art, Constellation—drawing in space by Marian Bijlenga presents the Dutch artist’s unique constructions. Approaching mark-making with material instead of drawing, the artist uses thread, fabric, and horsehair to create sculptures that play on positive and negative space.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 10, 2019

Former NMWA Fresh Talk speaker Carolyn Cocca reviews a new comic series featuring Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, which centers “a person who has overcome great odds to stand up for justice, equality, and hope.”

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gets the comic book treatment; Images (L to R): Joe Benitez; Joel Herrera; Joe Benitez

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gets the comic book treatment; Images (L to R): Joe Benitez; Joel Herrera; Joe Benitez

New Party, Who Dis? may have 23 co-creators who are mostly male, but Cocca praises the series as it “names and satirizes the kinds of oppressive dog whistles that undermine imagining marginalized peoples as superheroes and leaders.”

Front-Page Femmes

Norma Miller, the “Queen of Swing” who made the Lindy Hop a Jazz Age craze, has died at 99.

Artsy profiles Leonora Carrington and how she brought a feminist intensity to Surrealist painting.

City Lab looks at the influence of architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky, the first Austrian women architect and designer of the pioneering Frankfurt Kitchen.

Hyperallergic takes a deep dive into parenting and labor in the art world, noting, “It is long past time for museum leadership…to publicly support better workplace policies for everyone.”

Illustration of Amy Sherald by Lauren Tamaki; Photo courtesy of The Cut

Illustration of Amy Sherald by Lauren Tamaki; Photo courtesy of The Cut

Philadelphia’s Gayborhood is getting a new mural by Amy Sherald; Sherald recently spoke to The Cut about life after painting Michelle Obama.

MOCA Los Angeles has named Mia Locks as senior curator and head of new initiatives and announced it will not hire a chief curator to replace Helen Molesworth, who was fired last year.

Curator and social media guru Kimberly Drew shares her Frieze New York schedule.

artnet reviews French artist Laure Prouvost’s “standout exhibition” at the Venice Biennale.

Deborah Dugan has been named  president of the Grammy Awards/Recording Academy—she is the first female leader in the organization’s 64-year history.

Hyperallergic interviews photographer Nydia Blas about the “Black feminine lens” that sets her apart.

Shows We Want to See

At the New-York Historical Society, Augusta Savage: Renaissance Womanhighlights over 50 sculptures, photos, and letters that detail Savage’s influence as an overlooked artist, activist and educator, a trailblazer of African American arts from the Great Depression to the postwar period.”

Augusta Savage viewing two of her sculptures, Susie Q and Truckin, 1939; Photo courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Augusta Savage viewing two of her sculptures, Susie Q and Truckin, 1939; Photo courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

At the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Maria Lassing: Ways of Being “features more than 200 loaned artworks, with key pieces including her last self-portrait, Selbstporträt mit Pinsel. In addition to her paintings and drawings, the survey is remarkable for presenting a large selection of her films and sculptures, including works that have never been shown before.”

Women Artists in Europe from the Monarchy to Modernism is on view at the Dallas Museum of Art until June 9. The exhibition highlights the DMA’s holdings of artwork by female artists working in Europe between the late 18th and early 20th centuries, including Elisabeth Vigée-LeBrun, Rosa Bonheur, and Käthe Kollwitz.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 3, 2019

After the Polish Ministry of Culture demanded the removal of a work by artist Natalia LL—in which a topless woman eats a banana—1,000 people attended a banana-eating demonstration outside of the National Museum in Warsaw in protest.

Natalia LL, Consumer Art video stills, 1973; Photo credit: Carmen Jaspersen/picture alliance/Getty Image

Natalia LL, Consumer Art video stills, 1973; Photo credit: Carmen Jaspersen/picture alliance/Getty Image

The 1973 video, Consumer Art, created while the country was under communist rule, “is about the lack of supplies in a repressed country and the impossibility for people to consume the food that should be essential. It is an analogy of the impossibility for women to consume their own desire and have full access to their sexuality.”

Front-Page Femmes

The Guardian reflects on Australia’s Archibald prize for portraiture—in which only 15 paintings of women and three of non-white Australians have won in 97 years—and asks: could a portrait of a black woman win?

Hyperallergic features two poems by Cambodian American poet Monica Sok in its monthly series.

Mavis Pusey, the Jamaican-born artist who worked in geometric abstraction, died on April 20 at 90 years old.

A Message From the Future, the short film that animates the vision of the Green New Deal, was created by a female-led team, including Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, writer Naomi Klein, and artist Molly Crabapple.

On May 1, Japanese American sculptor Ruth Asawa was the subject of a Google Doodle created by Google staff artist Alyssa Winans.

The Ruth Asawa Google doodle by Alyssa Winans; Courtesy of Google

The Ruth Asawa Google doodle by Alyssa Winans; Courtesy of Google

Netflix has announced its first original African animated series, “Mama K’s Team 4,” which tells the story of four teenage girls living in a futuristic version of Lusaka, Zambia, who are recruited to save the world.

Miriam Katzeff has been named the new deputy director of Artists Space, the storied alternative art space and pillar of downtown New York.

The New York Times argues that music festivals need more Beyoncés—these events are still male-dominated, even though women are dominating music.

Hyperallergic reviews Diana Al-Hadid’s mosaics at New York City’s 34th Street Penn Station stop.

The Los Angeles Times profiles the new film Little and the five black women artists who have converged to make it a hit.

Shows We Want to See

Margot Gran, The Girls; Part of the Her Dress, Her Symbol: Antea Revisited exhibition; Photo courtesy of Agripas 12

Margot Gran, The Girls; Part of Her Dress, Her Symbol: Antea Revisited; Photo courtesy of Agripas 12

Joan Mitchell: I carry my landscapes around with me opens at the David Zwirner Gallery in New York today. The gallery’s first show of Mitchell’s work spans four decades, and is the first to focus on Mitchell’s multipaneled canvases.

In Jerusalem, Her Dress, Her Symbol: Antea Revisited examines the subject of the dress from a gender perspective—including both women and men—while recalling a unique phenomenon in the Israeli art scene, the work of the Antea Gallery for feminist art, which was active from 1994 to 2009. The exhibition is on view at two adjacent galleries, Agripas 12 and Marie Gallery.

Louise Nevelson: Wood Assemblages from the 1970s opens at New York’s Galerie Gmurzynska. The show features Nevelson’s monochromatic wood assemblages and rarely seen collages.


—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: April 26, 2019

Zanele Muholi portrait; Image © Zanele Muholi; Courtesy of the artist, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York, and Stevenson Cape Town/Johannesburg

Zanele Muholi portrait; Image © Zanele Muholi; Courtesy of the artist, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York, and Stevenson Cape Town/Johannesburg

The May issue of Out magazine delves into the power of art with a feature on visual activist Zanele Muholi, who came of age in South Africa’s apartheid era.

Muholi depicts the LGBTQI communities of South Africa, creating empowering images that seek to correct the distorted visual narrative around them. “I’m producing this work as a concerned citizen of this country,” Muholi says. “I want to change what is written about us, what we are fed and forced to consume because we are told that we need to become better persons.”

Front-Page Femmes

artnet rounds up five solo shows by women artists to take in during Berlin Gallery Weekend.

The Art Newspaper interviews Simone Leigh about her commitment to representing the experience of black women.

Amanda Williams and Olalekan Jeyifous have been named the designers of the forthcoming Shirley Chisholm monument in New York City.

Mary Gabriel’s book Ninth Street Women will become a series on Amazon—who might play the pioneering artists?

Sarah Lewis’s “Vision & Justice” course has grown into a full convening, which kicks off this week to explore “the role of the arts in identity and justice.”

Wonderland interviews illustrator Alice Skinner about her relatable images of female friendships, diverse bodies, and her underlying messaging.

Illustrator Alice Skinner’s Afterparty Scene; photo courtesy Wonderland Magazine

Illustrator Alice Skinner’s Afterparty Scene; photo courtesy Wonderland Magazine

In partnership with Artsy, CNN has published “A brief history of female rage in art,” profiling seven works that show the beauty and power of female rage.

Vogue profiles eight Indigenous beaders who are modernizing their craft.

The Guardian reviews Tate’s new all-female collection rehang, which they say “contains some great art, but is too shallow to shake things up.”

Hyperallergic looks at the record-breaking Hilma af Klint exhibition, which drew over 600,000 visitors.

Meet Rosalba Carriera, “the first woman artist millionaire you’ve never heard of.”

Forbes interviews Cheyenne Westphal, chairwoman of Phillips auction house in London, who “shares her secrets of conquering two decades of master sales.”

Shows We Want to See

At the Aspen Art Museum, Margaret Kilgallen: that’s where the beauty is examines the artist’s roots in printmaking, American and non-Western folk history and folklore, and feminist strategies of representation.

Margaret Kilgallen, Untitled, ca. 2000; Acrylic on canvas; Courtesy of the Estate of Margaret Kilgallen and Ratio 3, San Francisco

Margaret Kilgallen, Untitled, ca. 2000; Acrylic on canvas; Courtesy of the Estate of Margaret Kilgallen and Ratio 3, San Francisco

At the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, the first major U.S. solo exhibition of Chilean-born artist Cecilia Vicuña will open on Saturday. Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen traces the artist’s career-long commitment to exploring discarded and displaced materials, peoples, and landscapes.

At the Guggenheim Museum, Simone Leigh, Loophole of Retreat is on view—presented on the occasion of Leigh winning the 2018 Hugo Boss Prize. Leigh layers “form, sound, and text to fashion narratives of resilience and resistance.”

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: April 19, 2019

Clockwise: Awol Erikzu’s photograph of Beyoncé; Our Lady of Guadalupe; Frida Kahlo photographed by Nickolas Muray

Clockwise: Awol Erikzu’s photograph of Beyoncé; Our Lady of Guadalupe; Frida Kahlo photographed by Nickolas Muray

Artnet breaks down the ways Beyoncé has masterfully remixed art history over the years, creating her own visual language by using elements sourced from the Italian Renaissance to Afro-Futurism.

Among other examples, her 2017 pregnancy announcement photographs echo Our Lady of Guadalupe, Frida Kahlo, and The Birth of Venus; and scenes in the video for “Hold Up” parallel Pipilotti Rist’s 1997 video work Ever Is Over All. Her use of these images “…invite[s] contemplation about the African diaspora, about what it means to be a Black woman in America, or simply what it means to be a woman in today’s world.”

Front-Page Femmes

The New York Times reports on the contemporary jewelry inspired by Frida Kahlo, calling the artist “the 1940s counterpart to an influencer; a walking painting.”

Alexandra Suda becomes the fourth woman director of the National Gallery of Canada.

Roberta Smith, co-chief art critic of the New York Times, has won the Rabkin Foundation’s $50,000 lifetime achievement award—she will donate the money to the Art for Justice Fund.

The Whitney Museum has acquired 300 artworks over the past six months, and works by Nina Chanel Abney, Barbara Hammer, Simone Leigh, and Mary Weatherford will enter its collection for the first time.

Afghanistan’s first female conductor, who leads the country’s all-female Zohra Orchestra, is convinced that music can help deliver peace to the country—if only the Taliban will listen.

A shot of Afghanistan’s all-female orchestra performing at the World Economic Forum in Davos

Afghanistan’s all-female orchestra performs at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Jan. 2017; Photographer: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Hyperallergic reports on the viral photograph that has come to symbolize the power of the Sudanese women leading the nation’s recent uprising against ruler Omar Hassan al-Bashir.

A new novel about Louise Bourgeois attempts to channel the artist on the page with a “sometimes uncomfortable” performance of the artist’s voice.

The Art Newspaper profiles Katie Paterson’s Future Library and how to “future-proof” the ongoing work, which will not be completed until 2114.

Buzzfeed interviews the granddaughter of Lee Miller, once the official war photographer for Vogue during World War II, on the artist’s lasting legacy.

Show We Want to See

Opening today at the Pérez Art Museum in Miami, Beatriz González: A Retrospective is the first large-scale U.S. retrospective of the 81-year-old Bogotá-based artist. It will include 150 works from the 1960s through today that embody the full oeuvre of the artist, who was part of the “radical women” generation in Latin America.

Beatriz González, Los Predicadores, 2000; Charcoal and pastel on canvas; Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Jorge M. Pérez

Beatriz González, Los Predicadores, 2000; Charcoal and pastel on canvas; Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Jorge M. Pérez

At Vancouver’s Bill Reid Gallery, the exhibition water honours us: womxn and waterways features works by Indigenous women artists that aim to combat stereotypes. Organized by the ReMatriate Collective, the show “explores the roles of Indigenous women as childbearers, healers, and doulas, and their relationships with water.”

At the Oakland Museum of Contemporary Art, Queer California Untold Stories presents contemporary artwork and historical materials that deepen the stories of transgender communities, people of color, women, and others who have been left out of history.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: April 12, 2019

This week, a team of more than 200 researchers released the first image of a black hole. The feat was years in the making and made possible by algorithms written in part by 29-year-old Katie Bouman, one of just a few women on the team.

Katie Bouman watches a computer screen excitedly as the first image of a black hole is created with the algorithim she helped write.

Katie Bouman watches the first image of a black hole being created; Photo credit: Katie Bouman Facebook

With a background in computer science, electrical engineering, and computer vision, Bouman has a passion for “coming up with ways to see or measure things that are invisible.” She may be in science, but it’s clear Bouman has the sensibilities of an artist.

Front-Page Femmes

Beverly Cleary, award-winning author of the “Ramona” series, turns 103 today, and Slate reflects on how she transformed her difficult childhood into heartwarming fiction.

French sculptor Claude Lalanne has died at age 93. “In a few decades, [she] created unforgettable and universal worlds where poetry and imagination speak to everyone.”

Artsy remembers the forgotten women who hand-painted the first color films. The meticulous work was seen as similar to “domestic, female-coded tasks like painting glass or china.”

Hyperallergic profiles the January 2019 gathering of 100 Black women, non-binary artists, and curators at the Art Gallery of Ontario, organized by Black Wimmin Artists.

The Art Newspaper reports on Art Paris, describing this year’s fair as markedly more feminist, but still lacking a clear identity.

A painting by Emma Amos of an African American man and woman dancing in the center of a green circle that is framed by a blue background. Around them other smaller figures--white, black, singular, couples, clothed, naked--dance in varying poses.

Emma Amos’s Let Me Off Uptown (1999–2000) sold for a record $125,000 at the Swann African American Art Sale

The latest sale of African American fine art at Swann Auction Galleries resulted in records for several living women artists, including Simone Leigh, Emma Amos, and Howardena Pindell.

Dazed profiles women surrealists and their contributions to the movement, noting that they “emblazoned surrealism with a new type of self-awareness never achieved by their male counterparts.”

Artsy examines how the biblical story of Judith beheading Holofernes “became art history’s favorite icon of female rage.”

The National Museum of Wales admitted its collections “embed historical injustice” after research showed that men dominated its recent exhibitions.

The National Endowment for the Arts celebrates 2019 Jazz Master Maria Schneider with a tribute video ahead of the April 15 Jazz Masters Tribute Concert.

Shows We Want to See

At the FM Center for Contemporary Art in Milan, The Unexpected Subject: 1978 Art and Feminism in Italy is on view—it is the “first extensive survey on the relationship between feminist movements and visual arts in Italy.”

Maria Lassnig: Ways of Being is open at Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum. It is the first large survey of the Austrian artist and includes more than 200 paintings, drawings, films, and sculptures.

At the Queens Museum, Alexandria Smith threads religious and African American cultural themes in her memorial installation Monuments to an Effigy, which honors the African and Native women buried—but never acknowledged—at the Old Towne of Flushing Burial Ground in Queens.

Sheila Hicks, VARMAYANA (The Place of Shining Light), 2018; Installation view at Poussières d’étoiles, Domaine des Etangs, Massignac, France, 2018

Sheila Hicks, VARMAYANA (The Place of Shining Light), 2018; Installation view at Poussières d’étoiles, Domaine des Etangs, Massignac, France, 2018; Photo: Arthur Péquin; Courtesy the artist and galerie frank elbaz

On April 13, Sheila Hicks’s Campo Abierto (Open Field) will open at The Bass in Miami. The show will explore “the formal, social, and environmental aspects of landscape that have been present, yet rarely examined,” throughout Hicks’s career.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: April 5, 2019

A black and white photo of artist Anni Albers at work in her studio. She wears a polka dot bandanna on her head and a plain white sweater. The photo is taken from the side of a loom, her hands are working the wood sections as she weaves.

Anni Albers in her weaving studio at Black Mountain College, 1937; Photo by Helen M. Post Modley; Courtesy of Western Regional Archives, State Archives of North Carolina

As the Bauhaus turns 100, female members of the influential design school are finally getting their due with long belated attention paid to their important—and historically overlooked—contributions.

Curbed celebrates six trailblazing Bauhaus women, noting, “Now weaver Anni Albers can have a solo retrospective at the Tate Modern. Now Lucia Moholy’s photographs can be treated as works of art in themselves, not, as documentation of other people’s genius, as some of her more famous colleagues thought. But it took so long, and these stories remain so frustrating.”

Front-Page Femmes

Harper’s Bazaar interviews Judy Chicago on feminism, fame, and the renewed appreciation for her decades of work.

Washington, D.C.’s National Portrait Gallery has opened the exhibition Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence, the most comprehensive show ever on the fight for women’s suffrage in the U.S.

Hyperallergic remembers Agnès Varda and her rich body of work, which “begs for deep and continual consideration.”

artnet looks at Brazil’s surprisingly feminist art world, where women artists enjoy equal recognition and market value with their male peers.

The Washington Post reviews NMWA’s current Ursula von Rydingsvard exhibition, The Contour of Feeling, hailing the artist’s “remarkable body of work and courageous honesty.”

A photograph of sculptor Ursula von Rydingsvard, center, who is surrounded by her four studio assistants--one woman, three men--as they stand in a large studio/warehouse space in front of her massive "Bowl With Folds" sculpture. The artist and her assistants all wear protective white jumpsuits, which are tarnished with graphite and two assistants have masks hanging around their necks.

Ursula von Rydingsvard, center, surrounded by studio assistants in front of Bowl With Folds (1998–99) in Detroit in 2017; Photo courtesy of Kevin Silary/Galerie Lelong & Co.

The Library of Congress has acquired 157 handwritten letters from Georgia O’Keeffe and her husband, Alfred Stieglitz.

Brandi Cheyenne Harper pens an essay for Design*Sponge on what it means to be a black artist in the design community.

Hyperallergic reviews Simone Fattal’s first U.S. retrospective, Works and Days, on view at MoMA PS1, “a feminist expression of pure modernity from an ever-conflicted Beirut.”

The life story of renowned poet and writer Maya Angelou is being developed into a one-woman Broadway show, set to debut in 2021.

Not long before the election of Chicago’s first black woman mayor, The Cut interviewed Eve Ewing, poet, playwright, scholar, sociologist, and “Chicago’s true mayor: a young, charismatic guardian of the city’s possibility and spirit.”

Shows We Want to See

A painting of a black woman who is positioned in the center, wearing a white head scarf and dress, with a subtle pink sky behind her, palm trees, a sun, and the words "Lua Cheia" painted in black over the sun. Her expression is forlorn and in the lower half of the painting there is a yellow bandanna, red goggles or a bikini, and blue shorts.

Cassi Namoda, Moon Bather, 2019; Photo: Ian Byers-Gamber, courtesy of the artist and François Ghebaly

At the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia, Sonya Clark: Monumental Cloth, The Flag We Should Know spotlights the Confederate Flag of Truce—a cloth that brokered peace and represented the promise of reconciliation—and proposes it as a monumental alternative to the divisive Confederate Battle Flag. For the exhibition, Clark created 101 replicas of the Truce Flag, along with a massive replica ten times the size of the original.

Cassi Namoda’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, The Day a Monkey is Destined to Die All Trees Become Slippery, is on view at François Ghebaly Gallery. “Like the exhibition’s title, a folk saying in Namoda’s birth country of Mozambique, the works in the show explore the mythologies and proverbs of daily life in East Africa from the perspective of a vibrant young storyteller.”

 

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.