Art Fix Friday: February 8, 2019

The Washington Post profiles Ambreen Butt and Shahzia Sikander, two Pakistani American women artists “reinvent[ing] traditional art with unconventional subjects.”

Ambreen Butt's etching depicts a dragon hovering above a woman wearing a hijab with her head arched back, chest up to the sky. The pale yellow background is patterned with the sketches of hand guns.

Ambreen Butt, Untitled (Woman/Dragon) (from the series “Daughters of the East”) (detail), 2008; Etching, aquatint, spit bite aquatint, drypoint, and hand coloring on paper, 25 x 19 in.; Courtesy of the artist; Photo by Stephen Petegorsky

NMWA hosts Butt’s first solo exhibition in D.C, Ambreen Butt—Mark My Words, in which she uses her training in classical Indo-Persian miniature painting to explore contemporary political narratives. Similarly, Sikander’s work is highlighted at the National Portrait Gallery, where she is the first artist from Pakistan to have her work acquired and displayed by the museum. “As these remarkable artists prove, making one’s mark sometimes means rewriting the rules.”

Front-Page Femmes

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Carmen Bambach wins the inaugural Vilcek Prize to Support Immigrant Achievement.

Vogue spotlights three female directors who did not receive Oscar nominations this year, but whose work is “on the frontier of changing the face of Hollywood.”

Ivanka Vacuuming, a new performance piece from Jennifer Rubell, opened at Washington D.C.’s Flashpoint Gallery this week to much debate.

A portrait of United States Artists CEO Deana Haggag wearing a hot pink suit and jeweled, chunky soled Gucci sneakers.

Deana Haggag, CEO of United States Artists, in a Rachel Comey suit and Gucci sneakers; Photo by Gabriela Herman

The Cut profiles Deana Haggag, CEO of United States Artists, tireless arts advocate, cancer survivor, and owner of some very fly shoes.

Mexican American writer Sandra Cisneros has won the 2019 PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. Cisneros’s celebrated body of work is credited with “inspiring a new era of Latinx writers we see emerging today.”

Artsy takes a look at the pioneering work of the women who designed car interiors at General Motors in the 1950s.

The Museum of Modern Art has announced plans to close in the Summer/Fall of 2019 for renovations, a collection rehang, and a renewed focus on women artists, Latin American, and African American art—their exhibition on reopening will feature Betye Saar.

Five female artists talk about the way Los Angeles has influenced their art.

After Sotheby’s Masters Week, artnet asks: Are female old masters an untapped market, or a marketing ploy?

Vice interviews eight black women artists and entrepreneurs about their representation in pop culture and how they are changing the narrative.

Marina Abramović’s new piece, The Life, will be the first large-scale performance presented in the Mixed Reality form, a new technology that merges real and virtual worlds.

Shows We Want to See

A charcoal and colored pencil self portrait sketch by Frida Kahlo titled Appearances Can Be Deceiving. The artist is depicted with her signature braids piled atop her head, the dress she wears is transparant so the viewer can see under she wears her corrective corset. Her sprin is depicted as a steel rod and there are blue butterfly tattoos on her right leg.

Frida Kahlo, Appearances Can Be Deceiving, n.d.; Charcoal and colored pencil on paper; Collection of Museo Frida Kahlo; © Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving opens today at the Brooklyn Museum—the largest U.S. exhibition of the artist’s work in a decade. The show is the first to include many personal items from Casa Azul, her home-turned-museum in Mexico City, that were rediscovered in 2004. “The objects shed new light on how Kahlo crafted her appearance and shaped her personal and public identity to reflect her cultural heritage and political beliefs, while also addressing and incorporating her physical disabilities.”

Tracy Emin’s new exhibition, A Fortnight of Tears, opened at London’s White Cube gallery this week. An expansive show that includes sculpture, neon, painting, film, photography, and drawing, her works “cover the whole spectrum from loss and pathos to anger, and love.” Emin talked candidly to the Art Newspaper Weekly podcast about the difficult events that inspired the material. “I’ve never been so honest,” she said.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: February 1, 2019

At 98 years old, Venezuelan-born artist Luchita Hurtado is finally getting her due with her first major retrospective and a string of solo exhibitions this year and in 2020.

Luchita Hurtado stands in her home studio, surrounded by her paintings, many depicting scenes of nature.

Luchita Hurtado in her Los Angeles home studio; Photo by Laure Joliet for the New York Times

The pioneering artist has been “at the forefront of not just spiritual surrealism, but also the environmental and feminist art movements.” Hans Ulrich Obrist, organizer of Hurtado’s upcoming retrospective in London, notes that “she navigated a century of different contexts and played an important role in all of those.”

Front-Page Femmes:

The 2014 recipient of NMWA’s Mellor Prize for distinguished scholarship on women artists, Carole Blumenfeld, has published her book on the 18th- and 19th-century French painter Marguerite Gérard.

Artist Naima Green seeks to update Catherine Opie’s “Dyke Deck,” a set of playing cards that “represented a 1990s West Coast corner of the lesbian scene.” Green wants to include a wider spectrum of queerness.

Patricia McBride Lousada, a founding member of the New York City Ballet and noted cookbook author, has died at the age of 89.

Élisabeth Louise Vigée-LeBrun’s painting Portrait of Muhammad Dervish Khan has sold for $7.2 million at Sotheby’s “The Female Triumphant” sale.

Victoria Beckham stands in a white jumpsuit with a red belt, in front of Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun's Portrait of Muhammad Dervish Khan. Khan holds a sword, wears white, and looks powefully off into the distance.Beckham mimicks his pose.

Victoria Beckham with Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun’s Portrait of Muhammad Dervish Khan at the exhibition for “The Female Triumphant” at Sotheby’s New York; Photo courtesy of Tom Newton

Artsy explores how nuns have shaped the course of art history.

Starting February 24, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago will offer discounted admission for visitors who believe the gender pay gap has negatively affected their earnings. The move coincides with a Laurie Simmons retrospective.

The Mellon Foundation has released the second iteration of their 2015 survey on museum diversity, finding that more people of color were hired in 2018, and more women stepped into leadership positions.

Heather Harmon has been named deputy director of the forthcoming Las Vegas branch of the Nevada Art Museum.

Influential artist and designer Florence Knoll Bassett has died at age 101.

Hyperallergic reviews Yes, and the body has memory, a group show of women photographers who explore trauma, family, ancestry, and the female body.

At the recent Talking Galleries symposium, economist Clare McAndrew reported her findings that the more established a woman artist becomes, the less likely she is to find gallery representation.

The Guardian reports on the upsurge in exhibitions of work by women artists, but asks: will they stay on the walls once the trend for representation has passed?

Polish art collector Grażyna Kulczyk has created a haven for women artists in a tiny Swiss village, Muzeum Susch.

Shows We Want to See:

At the Art Gallery of Ontario, Mickalene Thomas: Femmes Noires is on view until March 24. The expansive exhibition—Thomas’s first solo showing in Canada—includes her vibrant paintings, silkscreens, photographs, time-based media, and site-specific installations—all exploring how Black women are represented in art and pop culture.

Mickalene Thomas's piece Diahann Carroll #2, a closeup of a black woman's face in grey-scale.

Mickalene Thomas, Diahann Carroll #2, 2018, Silkscreen ink on acrylic on mirrored mounted on wood panel; Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris/Brussels; © Mickalene Thomas / SOCAN (2018)

Annabeth Rosen: Fired, Broken, Gathered, Heaped, the first major museum survey of the critically acclaimed ceramicist, is on view until March 10 at the Cranbrook Art Museum in Michigan. The exhibition includes more than 20 years of her work and demonstrates Rosen’s ability to “push the medium beyond spectacle and into dialogues about feminist thought, labor, and endurance.”

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: January 25, 2019

Musician Brenda Navarrete; Photo: Rose Marie Cromwell

Cuban jazz artist Brenda Navarrete; Photo: Rose Marie Cromwell

The New Yorker profiles five female jazz musicians emerging from Havana and reshaping the scene.

While Cuban women have always made their mark on jazz music, they have predominantly been singers or limited to all-female dance bands. The new vanguard includes, among others, multi-instrumentalist Brenda Navarrete, who has mastered at least twelve instruments, including the traditional batá drum, which women are often prohibited from playing.

Front-Page Femmes

Forbes profiles NMWA’s newly reinstalled collection. “The goal was not just to show ‘new’ art, but to highlight women artists’ exceptional range of approaches and mediums,” explained Deputy Director for Art, Programs, and Public Engagement/Chief Curator Kathryn Wat.

The Atlantic examines the ways that the three female actresses in the Oscar-nominated film The Favourite use their bodies to “rage against expectations of courtly decorum…as they navigate the halls of power.”

The celebrated poet Mary Oliver, renowned for her meditations on the natural world, has passed away at the age of 83.

While SheBuiltNYC succeeded in getting approval for its plan to build a permanent statue of Shirley Chisolm in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, their original proposal intended to shift the masculine paradigm of singular statues by honoring the collaborative efforts of women with a group statue.

Black Girl Nerds lists all of the films at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival directed by women. This comes on the heels of the Oscar nominations, which did not include any nominations for women directors.

Jenny Holzer, from Inflammatory Essays, 1979–82; Courtesy of the artist; Image © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Jenny Holzer, from Inflammatory Essays, 1979–82; Courtesy of the artist; Image © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Artsy looks at Jenny Holzer’s “Inflammatory Essays” (1979–82), seemingly timeless and re-contextualized in America’s current political climate.

The Art Newspaper Podcast discusses the growing movement to bring female Old Masters to prominence, and the signature faking that kept 17th-century artist Judith Leyster out of the spotlight.

Actress and comedian Jessy Yates is the first recipient of the Yale School of Drama’s scholarship for actors with disabilities.

United States Artists announced its 2019 winners, including Simone Leigh, Juliana Huxtable, Wu Tsang, Cecilia Vicuña, and more. Winners receive $50,000 in unrestricted funding.

Shows We Want to See

At Tulane University’s Newcomb Art Museum, formerly incarcerated women team up with more than 30 artists to portray the challenges women in the prison system face. Per(Sister): Incarcerated Women in Louisiana, features artwork that highlights the lasting impact of long-term incarceration on women and their families. “The show…comes at a time when our nation, states, and local communities are grappling with how to have collective and constructive conversations about the issue of mass incarceration,” says museum spokeswoman Miriam Taylor.

From She Persists: A Century of Women Artists in New York at Gracie Mansion: left, Betty Parsons, “Brick in the Sky” (1968); center, Simone Leigh, “The Village Series #7” (2019), stoneware; right, Alice Neel, “Ginny and Elizabeth” (1975); Photo: Tawni Bannister for the New York Times

From She Persists: A Century of Women Artists in New York at Gracie Mansion: left, Betty Parsons, “Brick in the Sky” (1968); center, Simone Leigh, “The Village Series #7” (2019), stoneware; right, Alice Neel, “Ginny and Elizabeth” (1975); Photo: Tawni Bannister for the New York Times

At Gracie Mansion, the residence of the Mayor of New York, She Persists: A Century of Women Artists in New York is on view through January 2020. Including works by 44 artists and collectives, the show is the largest to be mounted at the mansion and the first to highlight women artists. First lady Chirlane McCray said, “The exhibit is really important at this time, given the #MeToo movement, the centennial anniversary of the suffrage movement, [and] the historic number of women running for office.”

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: January 11, 2019

NPR profiles Asian-American women artists who are re-creating the food of their cultures in sculptural form, a way to pay tribute to their heritage and celebrate their identity.

Artist Stephanie Shih’s porcelain dumplings; Courtesy of Robert Bredvad

Artist Stephanie Shih’s porcelain dumplings; Courtesy of Robert Bredvad

Artists Stephanie Shih, Monyee Chau, and Annie Shen craft dumplings, sticky rice buns, pork belly slices, and bao sandwiches using plaster, paint, and porcelain. Of her work, Shih says, “I’m thinking about my younger self and what these images might mean to someone who feels that they have been deprived of having their own culture elevated.”

Front-Page Femmes

Scientists discovered the blue pigment lapis lazuli in the teeth of a medieval female skeleton and have established she was likely a painter, contributing to the lavish illustrations of sacred texts.

Artprice released a list of the Top 20 Female Artists in the Global Art Market for 2018. Though the art market’s gender gap still persists, data reveals that women artists under 40 are taking the secondary market by storm.

Art in America reviews Lisa Yuskavage’s just-closed show Babie Brood, praising her technical brilliance and observing lowbrow inspirations.

Ruth Estévez has been named senior curator at large at Brandeis University’s Rose Art Museum.

The Haus der Kunst in Munich has canceled two separate shows by women artists Joan Jonas and Adrian Piper. Painter Markus Lüpertz will replace them, leading many to criticize the move as a “return to the proven figures of the art world, who are primarily German and male.”

Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, México, (Our Lady of the Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico), 1979; Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, México, (Our Lady of the Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico), 1979; Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The New York Times profiles renowned Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide in advance of her exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, opening on January 19.

The art of Fahrelnissa Zeid graced Google’s homepage on January 7, what would be her 118th birthday. She was one of the first Modernist female painters in Turkey.

Colossal profiles the latest collection from Amber Cowan, who is transforming discarded vintage glass into enchanting “sculptural paintings.”

Art in America’s list of the Best Photography Books of 2018 includes Janice Guy, Laia Abril, Deana Lawson, Klea McKenna, and Zanele Muholi.

Curator Carmen Hermo reflects on the late Sister Wendy Beckett.

Sotheby’s has announced the full lineup of this year’s Female Triumphant, a selection of masterworks by 14 female artists from the 16th to 19th centuries.

Shows We Want to See:

The “intimate, imperfectInstagram photos of poet and writer Eileen Myles are the subject of an exhibition at Bridget Donahue in New York City. Back Room: Eileen Myles – poems presents snapshots captured on walks around lower Manhattan, scenes around Myles’s apartment, and other bits of daily life. The show closes on January 13.

Judy Baca, Absolutely Chicana, 2002. Screenprint. Collection of the McNay Art Museum, Gift of Harriett and Ricardo Romo, 2013. © Judith F. Baca

Judy Baca, Absolutely Chicana, 2002, Screenprint; Collection of the McNay Art Museum, Gift of Harriett and Ricardo Romo, 2013; © Judith F. Baca

The McNay Art Museum in San Antonio will open Estampas Chicanas on January 17. The exhibition will present the works of women artists of the Chicano labor movement who were often overlooked and unheard. Pieces also depict other women in the movement, including labor leader Dolores Huerta and musician Lila Downs. Participating artists include Judy Baca, Patssi Valdez, Barbara Carrasco, Ester Hernandez, and Alma Lopez, among others.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: January 4, 2019

As a new exhibition of Frida Kahlo photographs opens in Australia, The Guardian dives into the commodification of her image, asking, “are we losing the artist under the kitsch?”

Frida Kahlo, by Guillermo Kahlo, 1932; © Frida Kahlo Museum

Frida Kahlo, by Guillermo Kahlo, 1932; © Frida Kahlo Museum

Makeup bags, candles, air fresheners, baby onesies, phone cases, earrings, pill boxes—Kahlo’s face is now found on thousands of products, a symbol selling modern feminism. Would Kahlo be pleased by this? The article explores both sides and wonders “if this commodification of an artist’s body has, or would ever, happen to a man?”


Front-Page Femmes

Hyperallergic interviews Faith Ringgold and explores the origins of her visual storytelling.

Artsy explores the performance work of Carolina Caycedo at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in California. Her work engages with the injustices committed against people of color in the institution’s history.

The Los Angeles Times profiles director Sophia Takal, who is bringing the female gaze to horror movies.

Judy Chicago, Tania Bruguera, and Deana Lawson are among the women featured on Elle’s list of creative tastemakers who are shedding light on critical issues.

Nicola L., Little TV Woman: ‘I Am the Last Woman Object’, 1969; Photo by Kyle Knodell, collection of Xavier Gellier

Nicola L., Little TV Woman: ‘I Am the Last Woman Object’, 1969; Photo by Kyle Knodell, collection of Xavier Gellier

French pop artist Nicola L. has died at age 81. Throughout her prolific career, she “carved unexpected paths through acts of making.”

A new biography on writer, artist, and “unlikely feminist icon” Eve Babitz is published. The Washington Post calls author Lili Anolik’s portrayal of the provocateur’s wild life a “swooning, sometimes madcap look at Babitz.”

Get to know eight influential women artists from Germany who overcame personal and societal limitations to conquer the global art scene.

Buzzfeed explores how zine libraries highlight and preserve the stories of women of color and other marginalized voices.

Deborah Marrow, the recently retired leader of the Getty Foundation, reflects on her 35 years at the institution.

Artsy looks at the work of Hannah Wilke, who simultaneously found success and “critical dissatisfaction” using her own naked body as subject.

Muriel Miguel, a founder of the feminist Native American collective Spiderwomen Theater, is interviewed by the New York Times on the upcoming First Nations Dialogues New York/Lenapehoking, a gathering that aims to build lasting “institutional support for Indigenous performing arts worldwide.”

Shows We Want to See

At Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde in Dubai, artist Hoda Tawakol’s When the Dates Turn Red works to deconstruct gender stereotypes. The exhibition comprises hand-dyed and sewn textiles, sculptures, fabric collages, and works on paper that “mimic female cycles of life.” The works are inspired by the 1970s feminist movement and her experiences growing up in France, Germany, and Egypt.

Hoda Takawol, Jungle #1, 2018, Fabric, wadding, thread, metal and wood, 220 x 350 x 25 cm

Hoda Takawol, Jungle #1, 2018, Fabric, wadding, thread, metal and wood, 220 x 350 x 25 cm

Empresses of China’s Forbidden City at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, tells the “little-known stories of how imperial women influenced court politics, art, and religion.” The dramatic show contains portraits, silk court vests, festive headdresses, silk scroll paintings, and artifacts. Included among them are “200 rare loans from Beijing’s Palace Museum, most of them visiting America for the first time.”

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: December 28, 2018

The Women’s Center for Creative Work in Los Angeles has announced the WCCW Stock Photo Project to diversify the internet’s stock photo database.

WCCW Stock Photo Project, Handywork/gardening category

WCCW Stock Photo Project, Handywork/gardening category

The L.A.-based nonprofit created the initiative in response to the homogeneous and “plastic” stock photos currently available. The goal is to feature “people of color, women, genderqueer, and disabled folks of all ages and body types, in a variety of settings and narratives.” Read more at Hyperallergic.

Front-Page Femmes

The New York Times profiles Denise Murrell, businesswoman turned curator, who is championing art’s black models by telling their stories and contextualizing their presence.

Louise Bourgeois’s first large-scale Spider sculpture leaves its home at the Museum of Modern Art in São Paulo to begin a multi-city tour around Brazil.

Artsy’s Most Influential Artists of 2018 list includes Judy Chicago, Adrian Piper, Joan Mitchell, Cao Fei, Simone Leigh, Wu Tsang, Charline von Heyl, and Andrea Fraser.

Hyperallergic reviews Kara Walker: Virginia’s Lynch Mob and Other Works at the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey. A show of “racially charged, morally fraught fantasies that offer no easy way in, or out.”

Detail of The Bower of Bliss, 2018, by Linder. Courtesy of Linder and Modern Art / Stuart Shave

Detail of The Bower of Bliss, 2018, by Linder. Courtesy of Linder and Modern Art / Stuart Shave

London’s Southwark tube station now features a feminist mural by the artist Linder, who succeeds in “seizing centuries of the male gaze through a woman’s lens.”

NMWA’s Arkansas Committee announces a statewide tour of “Arkansas Women to Watch 2019: Heavy Metal” that will kick off on Jan 7th.

Sister Wendy Beckett, nun and TV art critic, has passed away at age 88. Beckett was famous for her unscripted BBC arts documentaries.

Black Excellence highlights 10 Black Women Artists to Know.

Buzzfeed interviews Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey on her new collection, her time as U.S. poet laureate, and history—both personal and political—as a driving force in her work.

Shows We Want to See

A new exhibition in Moscow explores Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera’s connections to Russia. Viva La Vida: Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera includes Rivera’s mural Glorious Victory, which sat in storage for 50 years before being rediscovered a decade ago. A photo of Kahlo’s largest painting, The Wounded Table, is also included—the real piece has been missing since 1955 and the show’s curator is in search of it.

In Dresden, The Medea Insurrection: Radical Women Artists Behind the Iron Curtain showcases work created during the Soviet period by women artists from East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. They explored mythology, protest, and self-definition against classical figures like Medea and Cassandra with “punk provocation and defiance.”

Allerleirauh, Heike, Berlin (detail; 1988), Sibylle Bergemann; costume design by Angelika Kroker. Courtesy Loock Galerie, Berlin; © Estate of Sybille Bergemann

Heike, Allerleirauh, Berlin (detail; 1988), Sibylle Bergemann; costume design by Angelika Kroker. Courtesy Loock Galerie, Berlin; © Estate of Sybille Bergemann

At the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, Anne Brigman: A Visionary in Modern Photography rediscovers the work of the first woman in America to take nude self-portraits. Brigman’s ethereal photographs, most all taken outdoors, “prefigured much of the feminist art that would come decades later—in their fearless depictions of the body, expressed as rebellious freedom rather than submission.”

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: December 21, 2018

artnet profiles artist-activist Vanessa German, who has won the $200,000 Don Tyson Prize. German is an acclaimed sculptor, painter, poet, and performance artist who also runs a community-based art education program for children, Art House.

Vanessa German at the Art House; Photo by Sean Carroll

Vanessa German at the Art House; Photo by Sean Carroll

German bought the house, located in Pittsburgh’s Homewood neighborhood, with her art world earnings. She plans to use the Tyson prize money to open the Museum of Resilience, which will honor the neighborhood’s single black mothers and their children and inspire “social healing and connection.”

Front-Page Femmes

The Los Angeles Times reports that 2018 marks the first year in history that more women than men had solo exhibitions in L.A. art museums.

Meet the eight Latinas changing the conversation in the art world.

Hyperallergic reports on the sexual assault allegations at India’s Kochi-Muziris Biennale. During a Q&A with the Guerrilla Girls, protestors called out the biennale’s lack of action after allegations were made against its cofounder and two other prominent members.

The Tate Britain announces it will reinstall its free galleries with only work by women artists starting in April 2019.

Feminist artist Judy Chicago talks with artnet about visibility and her legacy.

Architect Amale Andraos, founder of WORKac, is chosen to design the Beirut Museum of Art, which will open in Lebanon in 2023.

Artsy profiles the new online database AWARE (Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions), which aims to rewrite art history “from a more gender-equal perspective.”

Artemisia Gentileschi, Self-Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria, ca. 1615–7; © The National Gallery, London

Artemisia Gentileschi, Self-Portrait as Saint Catherine of Alexandria, ca. 1615–7; © The National Gallery, London

London’s National Gallery unveiled a newly acquired Artemisia Gentileschi painting, and plans a pop-up tour and major show of the artist’s work in 2020.

The Guggenheim releases a short video introduction to Hilma af Klint, the mystical painter who is currently the subject of a high-profile exhibition.

Artsy’s 5 Photographers to Follow this December features four women.

Yalitza Aparicio, the star of the new film Roma, becomes the first Indigenous woman ever featured on the cover of Vogue Mexico.

Forbes talks artistic entrepreneurship, art world inclusivity, and more with Tiffany LaTrice, founder of TILA Studios, an arts incubator in Atlanta supporting black women visual artists.

Travel + Leisure reports on women muralists sparking a social dialogue in cities around the world.

Shows We Want to See

Cecilia Paredes, Sea of Roses, 2011; Photographic paper mounted on aluminum sintra, 39 ⅛ x 43 ¼ in.; Image courtesy of Cecilia Paredes and saltfineart

Cecilia Paredes, Sea of Roses, 2011; Photographic paper mounted on aluminum sintra, 39 ⅛ x 43 ¼ in.; Image courtesy of Cecilia Paredes and saltfineart

To create her camouflaged self-portraits, Peruvian artist Cecilia Parades wraps, covers, and paints her body to match richly patterned materials. She explores themes of identity, home, and cultural integration in work on view at the Museum of Latin American Art in Los Angeles.

Pioneering feminist painter Yun Suknam’s portraiture work is the subject of a major exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Portraits of the World: Korea features a wood assemblage portrait of her mother as well as portraits of American artists including Louise Bourgeois, Louise Nevelson, Marisol, and Kiki Smith.

—Alicia Gregory is the assistant editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: December 14, 2018

The National Gallery of Art has named Kaywin Feldman its new director. Feldman is the first woman ever to hold the position in the institution’s 77-year history.

Kaywin Feldman will start her new job as director of the National Gallery of Art in March. (Dan Dennehy/Minneapolis Institute of Arts/National Gallery of Art)

Kaywin Feldman will start her new job as director of the National Gallery of Art in March. (Dan Dennehy/Minneapolis Institute of Arts/National Gallery of Art)

“I do believe it is indicative of a sea change, nationally and internationally,” Feldman has said about her post. She comes to the NGA with an impressive track record of increasing both online and in-person visitors, accessibility, and has established programs that deepen community engagement.

Front-Page Femmes

Frieze connects the work of feminist theorist and filmmaker Laura Mulvey to the #MeToo movement.

The New York Times found that films with female leads earn more than those starring men.

Writer Zadie Smith interviews Toyin Ojih Odutola, whose portraits depict diasporic people of color “defy[ing] the smallness” that she feels America forces on them.

Toyin Ojih Odutola, Paris Apartment, 2016-17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8″ x 42″, Dean Collection, Courtesy of the Drawing Center, New York

Toyin Ojih Odutola, Paris Apartment, 2016-17. Charcoal, pastel, and pencil on paper, 59 3/8″ x 42″, Dean Collection, Courtesy of the Drawing Center, New York

Bomb profiles “rediscovered maverick” Ree Morton, whose sculptural work challenged notions of traditional feminism in the 1970s.

A new study shines light on the gendered wage gap in the U.K. art world.

The Anonymous Was a Woman program awards grants to established women artists over the age of 40. Here are the 2018 winners.

The Art Newspaper interviews three of the women in charge of some of the Arab art world’s key institutions.

Overlooked in Atlanta, black women artists head to Art Basel Miami Beach.

Victoria Beckham teams up with Sotheby’s to host an exhibition highlighting female Old Masters.

Recently jailed for protesting Cuba’s art censorship laws, performance artist Tania Bruguera has been released, and vows to remain in her home country to fight for artistic expression.

Two London gallerists discuss the art world’s current interest in female artists.

Hyperallergic interviews Andrea Giunta, curator of the acclaimed exhibition Radical Women, about the role of feminist art in post-election Brazil.

Shows We Want to See

A major survey of sculpture artist Cady Noland is on view at the Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt, Germany. Eerily relevant to America’s current political climate, the show draws heavily on some of the less pleasant aspects of America’s past. Hyperallergic praises the show’s “dark thematic complexity as well as formal rigor.”

Turner Prize-winning video artist Elizabeth Price exhibits two new films at the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis. These cinematic works explore current political issues in her native Britain, as well as the “relationship between the material and the digital, sites of labour and markers of gender and social class.”  

Ebony G. Patterson....wata marassa-beyond the bladez..., 2014. Mixed media on paper, 85 x 84 inches.Collection of Doreen Chambers and Philippe Monroguie, Brooklyn, NY. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

Ebony G. Patterson….wata marassa-beyond the bladez…, 2014. Mixed media on paper, 85 x 84 inches.Collection of Doreen Chambers and Philippe Monroguie, Brooklyn, NY. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago

Perez Art Museum Miami presents Ebony G. Patterson… while the dew is still on the roses….The Jamaican artist creates multi-media works saturated with embellishment to explore issues related to violence, masculinity, and youth within the post-colonial context of her native country.

—Becca Gross is the fall 2018 publications and marketing/communications intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: December 7, 2018

Artsy looks at the history of fierce pussy’s bold poster campaigns in New York City.

fierce pussy façade installation, Leslie-Lohman Museum. Photo © Kristine Eudey, 2018.

fierce pussy facade installation, Leslie-Lohman Museum. Photo © Kristine Eudey, 2018.

The queer women artist collective launched a provocative project in 1991, peppering the city with posters reclaiming the offensive language often used towards the LGBTQ+ community. Recently, the group has revamped that initiative, showcasing an updated version of their early works in the windows of the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in SoHo.

Front-Page Femmes

16 of the 21 awardees of the Andy Warhol Foundation’s 2018 Arts Writers Grant are women.

artnet news ventures into the studio of Cj Hendry, whose photorealistic drawings have earned her an impressive Instagram following.

Frieze interviews curator Julia Peyton-Jones for their Women in the Arts series.

“Please buy me these artworks.” Andrew Russeth, executive editor of ARTnews highlights 20 impressive women artists in his annual roundup of Art Basel Miami’s best offerings.

The Art Gallery of Ontario acquires one of Yayoi Kusama’s “Infinity Rooms” for their permanent collection.

Filmmaker Charlotte Prodger wins the prestigious 2018 Turner Prize.

Judy Chicago EU-69 Mother India (1985). Image courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York.

Judy Chicago, EU-69 Mother India (1985). Image courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York.

“It’s Judy time.” artnet and the New York Times feature iconic feminist artist Judy Chicago, who has upcoming shows at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Miami and here at NMWA in 2019.

Artsy profiles Lina Iris Viktor, who hopes her paintings can “counter the negative associations of blackness.”

Meet the film industry’s pioneering female directors in this new home video box set from Kino Classics.

“Radio Juxtapoz” podcast debuts with an interview with textile artist Lucy Sparrow.

The Dia Art Foundation acquires 155 sculptures by Minimalist artist Charlotte Posenenske.

In Chicago? Check out the events for Where the Future Came From, a collective research project on the history of Chicago’s feminist and women-run art activities.

Iranian artist Shirin Neshat discusses her experience creating political art—and when it can cross a line.

Shows We Want to See

A preeminent figure in art activism, sculptor and teacher Augusta Savage is regarded as one of the most significant artists of the Harlem Renaissance. Her work influenced countless African American artists and successfully “elevat[ed] images of black culture into mainstream America.” Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman is on view at the Cummer Museum in Jacksonville, Florida.

Akunnittinni: A Kinngait Family Portrait, currently at Pasadena’s Armory Center for the Arts, showcases the work of three generations of women from a single Inuit family. The exhibition “weaves together more than a century of personal, political, and cultural life in the Arctic,” presenting the experiences of these women in an “indigenous feminist context.”

Family Sleeping in a Tent, 2003-04, by Annie Pootoogook. (Eduardo J. Guarino Collection)

Family Sleeping in a Tent, 2003-04, by Annie Pootoogook. (Eduardo J. Guarino Collection)

Robilant + Voena gallery in London presents The Gentileschi Effect, a show highlighting Renaissance master Artemisia Gentileschi’s “influence over the centuries.” The exhibition includes several exquisite examples of Gentileschi’s work alongside those of her followers, both historical and contemporary.

—Becca Gross is the fall 2018 publications and marketing/communications intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: November 30, 2018

The Getty Research Institute has received a grant to digitize the archives of the historical Woman’s Building in Los Angeles.

The influential feminist art center was founded in 1973 by Judy Chicago, Sheila de Bretteville, and Arlene Raven. It gave women a space to experiment and learn, housing the first independent school for women artists.

Read more and hear from some of the artists involved in the project in this Hyperallergic feature.

Front-Page Femmes

Turner Prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid investigates how the prominent British newspaper The Guardian portrays black people.

Artsy calls attention to 7 Female Impressionists Every Art History Lover Should Know.

Lilian Rice, an important early 20th-century architect, is spotlighted in the New York TimesOverlooked No More series.

Betty Tompkins has (literally) made her mark on art history by painting the apologies of #MeToo offenders onto images of famous artworks.

A proposed Judy Chicago museum in the artist’s hometown of Belen, New Mexico, has been vetoed due to dissent from some of the local religious community.

Daria Martin wins the 2018 Film London Jarman Award.

According to Frieze, although many historical female artists have recently gained recognition through an increase in temporary exhibitions, museums are failing to take steps toward achieving gender parity in their permanent collections.

American Theatre highlights 10 plays by women of color currently running Off-Broadway.

Hyperallergic profiles Tamara Pertamina, a multidisciplinary artist seeking to “reclaim Indonesia’s pre-colonial acceptance of non-binary genders.”

Apollo and Artsy come to differing conclusions in their reviews of Sarah Lucas’s current New Museum retrospective.

The Met is receiving intense criticism for including only one woman in its upcoming exhibition Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll.

Kelsey Wishik, who was a part of NMWA’s recent exhibition Heavy Metal, created a mural for the city of Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

Shows We Want to See

Now on view at the Museo Textil de Oaxaca in Mexico, Emilia Sandoval’s solo show Buscas Aún, Nos Buscas Lugar (You Are Searching Still, Searching for a Place for Us) explores themes of death and loss. The exhibition is made up of “ghostly echoes” fashioned from the belongings of Sandoval’s late mother, which serve to bring an otherworldly spirit to those objects normally dismissed as commonplace.

The Eternal Thread, Louise Bourgeois’s first major exhibition in China, is on view at the Long Museum in Shanghai. The show weaves together seven decades of the artist’s diverse body of work, highlighting her incredible ability to “investigate the power of materials…to connect the present and the past.”

Sara Cwynar’s first museum show, Image Model Muse, is at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Cwynar’s work often deals with issues related to capitalism, prompting ARTnews to tout her as an artist who is “attuned to the rush of advertising and persuasion that now flows through screens and feeds.”

—Becca Gross is the fall 2018 publications and marketing/communications intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.