Art Fix Friday: June 17, 2016

Artsy profiles 20 early or mid-career female figurative painters who are “creating inspiring figurative paintings that speak to the present, and offer glimpses into the future.” The list includes NO MAN’S LAND artists Nina Chanel Abney, Hayv Kahraman, and Mira Dancy—as well as NMWA artist Amy Sherald.

Abney’s work “swiftly tackle topics related to race, gender, and politics.” Artsy writes that “a critical mass of female painters are embracing figuration, diversifying it, and pushing the conversation around it forward.”

Front-Page Femmes

“Just Me and Allah,” a photographic series by Samra Habib—a queer Muslim photographer—shares the stories of LBGT Muslims.

Activist groups protest Tate Modern’s new building for the exclusion of works by Ana Mendieta.

Painter Françoise Gilot—now 94 years old—discusses her past with Picasso, her career, and her attempts to buy back her paintings.

Juxtapoz features Brooklyn-based photographer Janelle Jones’s vibrant, candy-colored still-lifes.

Chinese artist Cao Fei is the youngest artist ever selected to create a BMW Art Car.

Yayoi Kusama–In Infinity is the first exhibition to highlight the Japanese artist’s interest in fashion and design.

Artforum shares “A Feminist Guide to Surviving the Art World,” highlighting works by prominent feminist artists.

For her “social sculpture” project, Percent for Green, Alicia Grullón conducts environmental justice workshops, providing a proposal for legislation.

Andra Ursuta’s Alps sculpture resembles a climbing wall—but with penis-shaped holds.

Mika Tajima’s temporary public art project is a hot pink hot tub that releases “techni-color clouds.”

Multidisciplinary artist Ciriza’s work “evokes the slow shedding of human hair and snake skin.”

Xiomara Reyes will become the new director of the Washington School of Ballet.

Teen thriller author Lois Duncan died at the age of 82.

The Atlantic explores how a short-lived 1908s spinoff series, She-Ra, offered an alternative to the male-dominated cartoon world.

Comedian Tig Notaro released her memoir, I’m Just A Person.

The Guardian interviews “punk-poet genius” Patti Smith.

The New Yorker writes that rocker Mitski Miyawaki’s lyrics “invite close readings, examinations that reveal submerged meanings.”

The Los Angeles Times raves about two murals featured in Cindy Sherman: Imitation of Life.

The Atlantic delves into the why Hollywood doesn’t tell more stories for and about girls.

AIGA explores design house Marimekko’s history of being “made for women and run by women”—and how 94% of its employees are women.

Shows We Want to See

Hyperallergic examines (left) and Georgia O'Keefe’s watercolors (right)

Hyperallergic examines Adriana Varejão’s portraits (left) and Georgia O’Keeffe’s watercolors (right)

In Kindred Spirits, Adriana Varejão encourages visitors to guess which portraits are images of native people and which are versions of modernist designs.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s Far Wide Texas examines 51 watercolor paintings O’Keeffe made during her two years teaching in Texas.

Women of Abstract Expressionism at the Denver Art Museum aims to correct the history of the male-dominated art movement. Vogue and the Denver Post interviewed the exhibition’s curator.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum opens The Art of Romaine Brooks.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 6, 2016

In the U.S. “only 27% of the 590 major solo shows organized by nearly 70 institutions between 2007 and 2013 were devoted to women.” The Art Newspaper outlines how influential donors, prizes for women, and diversifying museum leadership can help rectify the gender imbalance.

Helen Molesworth, the chief curator of MOCA, says that although the art world is progressive, “that doesn’t set us apart from the larger cultural forces at play, which have for the past several hundred years promoted the idea that genius and men and power and money are all very intertwined with one another.”

Front-Page Femmes

Marisol Escobar, known in the 1960s for her wooden Pop Art sculptures, died at the age of 85.

Adriana Varejão’s hand-painted tile mural covers Rio’s 2016 Summer Olympics aquatics stadium.

Tauba Auerbach makes a large, geometric pop-up book.

Mona Hatoum’s survey includes endoscopic video of her internal organs.

Iranian cartoonist Atena Farghadani was released from prison.

A fire at German artist Rosemarie Trockel’s home damaged and destroyed more than $30 million worth of art.

Cornelia Parker installed a Hitchcock-inspired barn on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Los Angeles Times traces 89-year-old artist Betye Saar‘s oeuvre through her recent and upcoming exhibitions.

Unnerving, surreal characters in Floria González’s photographs explore the impact of motherhood on her life.

Virginia-based teen Razan Elbaba uses photography to “break the stereotypes and significantly express the true goal of Muslim women.”

Art Basel visitors will help performance artist Alison Knowles toss a giant salad before it is served.

Heather Phillipson’s three-part installation for Frieze New York involves dog sculptures, video, trampolines, pillows and more.

The Guardian shares the @52museums Instagram project—highlighting one of NMWA’s posts.

“It’s so empowering for this generation to see a black ballerina doll that has muscles,” says Misty Copeland about the new Barbie made in her likeness.

NPR describes a new album by Anohni, formerly Antony Hegarty, as “a pop album that is simultaneously an act of dissent.”

Gabriela Burkhalter’s The Playground Project explores forgotten artistic playgrounds of the 20th century.

Sweet Lamb of Heaven, by Lydia Millet, is “an extraordinary metaphysical thriller.”

The New Yorker delves into two articles written by Harper Lee about the case that brought her to Kansas with Truman Capote.

The documentary Eva Hesse, structured around excerpts from her journals, provides a psychological portrait of the artist. Watch the trailer.

Shows We Want to See

Five women artists from the Electric Machete Studios collective locked themselves in their studio for 48 hours. The resulting works reflect the “complex identities of the women as feminists and artists.” Interventions: A Xicana & Boricua Guerrilla Perspective explores the relationship between art, feminism, and indigenous identity.

Abstract work by overlooked Victorian spiritualist Georgiana Houghton will be featured in London. The Guardian writes, “Houghton would host a seance, talk to her spirit guide and draw complex, colourful and layered watercolours.”

Carmen Herrera—now 101 years old—“distills painting to its purest elements.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.