Art Fix Friday: January 6, 2017

Carmen Herrera, now 101 years old, discusses her career with the Guardian. Herrera recalls the obstacles she faced as a woman artist in the mid-20th century. She explains, “Because everything was controlled by men, not just art.”

Herrera famously sold her first painting at age 89. The Huffington Post discusses her solo show Lines of Sight at the Whitney Museum of American Art, on view through January 9, 2017.

Front-Page Femmes

The Women’s March on Washington, in collaboration with the Amplifier Foundation, asks for art submissions to be used on posters and banners during the march. The deadline is 2 p.m. on Sunday, January 8, 2017.

She Who Tells a Story artist Shirin Neshat describes her photograph Speechless from the series “Women of Allah.” Neshat says, “It’s usually printed larger than life—so that when someone stands in front of it, the gun is pointing straight at their stomach.”

Barbara Jatta is the first woman to direct the Vatican Museums.

The Guardian features vivid, abstract paintings by Sandra Blow.

Leila Abdelrazaq draws comics representing the experiences of Palestinian refugees and immigrants.

Wiebke Maurer sculpts place settings in gold and silver filigree.

Artsy highlights eight women who turned food into feminist art.

Bustle reviews the film Hidden Figures, based on Margot Shetterly’s book about the black women mathematicians who helped make space flight possible.

The New York Times interviews Ruth Negga about her leading role in the film Loving.

Alexis Arnold poses discarded books and covers them in borax crystals.

New York’s Second Avenue Subway features expansive public art installations by Sarah Sze and Jean Shin.

NPR remembers Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher.

Beyoncé will be the first black woman to headline the music festival Coachella.

Actress Marlene Dietrich accumulated a massive collection of books and left handwritten notes in many of them.

NPR records Angel Olsen performing her song “Give It Up” in a church in the Bronx.

“Horror creeps into the most ordinary lines” in the novel Fever Dream by Argentinian author Samanta Schweblin.

In her new short story collection, Difficult Women, Roxanne Gay explores “stories of women who go to impossible places but are fighting to find their way back.”

Shows We Want to See

Nina Chanel Abney: Royal Flush, opening next month at the Nasher Museum of Art, features around 30 of Abney’s paintings. “Through her monumental paintings, Abney gives us the chance to have a meaningful conversation about issues of racial violence and social justice.”

The Creators Project interviews the co-directors of the crowd-sourced NASTY WOMEN Exhibition. The Huffington Post shares a small selection of the featured works submitted by 694 artists.

The Georgia Museum of Art features kinetic sculptures by New Orleans-based artist Lin Emery. “Executed in either polished or brushed aluminum, the sculptures take their cue from music, dance, and natural forms.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: May 6, 2016

In the U.S. “only 27% of the 590 major solo shows organized by nearly 70 institutions between 2007 and 2013 were devoted to women.” The Art Newspaper outlines how influential donors, prizes for women, and diversifying museum leadership can help rectify the gender imbalance.

Helen Molesworth, the chief curator of MOCA, says that although the art world is progressive, “that doesn’t set us apart from the larger cultural forces at play, which have for the past several hundred years promoted the idea that genius and men and power and money are all very intertwined with one another.”

Front-Page Femmes

Marisol Escobar, known in the 1960s for her wooden Pop Art sculptures, died at the age of 85.

Adriana Varejão’s hand-painted tile mural covers Rio’s 2016 Summer Olympics aquatics stadium.

Tauba Auerbach makes a large, geometric pop-up book.

Mona Hatoum’s survey includes endoscopic video of her internal organs.

Iranian cartoonist Atena Farghadani was released from prison.

A fire at German artist Rosemarie Trockel’s home damaged and destroyed more than $30 million worth of art.

Cornelia Parker installed a Hitchcock-inspired barn on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Los Angeles Times traces 89-year-old artist Betye Saar‘s oeuvre through her recent and upcoming exhibitions.

Unnerving, surreal characters in Floria González’s photographs explore the impact of motherhood on her life.

Virginia-based teen Razan Elbaba uses photography to “break the stereotypes and significantly express the true goal of Muslim women.”

Art Basel visitors will help performance artist Alison Knowles toss a giant salad before it is served.

Heather Phillipson’s three-part installation for Frieze New York involves dog sculptures, video, trampolines, pillows and more.

The Guardian shares the @52museums Instagram project—highlighting one of NMWA’s posts.

“It’s so empowering for this generation to see a black ballerina doll that has muscles,” says Misty Copeland about the new Barbie made in her likeness.

NPR describes a new album by Anohni, formerly Antony Hegarty, as “a pop album that is simultaneously an act of dissent.”

Gabriela Burkhalter’s The Playground Project explores forgotten artistic playgrounds of the 20th century.

Sweet Lamb of Heaven, by Lydia Millet, is “an extraordinary metaphysical thriller.”

The New Yorker delves into two articles written by Harper Lee about the case that brought her to Kansas with Truman Capote.

The documentary Eva Hesse, structured around excerpts from her journals, provides a psychological portrait of the artist. Watch the trailer.

Shows We Want to See

Five women artists from the Electric Machete Studios collective locked themselves in their studio for 48 hours. The resulting works reflect the “complex identities of the women as feminists and artists.” Interventions: A Xicana & Boricua Guerrilla Perspective explores the relationship between art, feminism, and indigenous identity.

Abstract work by overlooked Victorian spiritualist Georgiana Houghton will be featured in London. The Guardian writes, “Houghton would host a seance, talk to her spirit guide and draw complex, colourful and layered watercolours.”

Carmen Herrera—now 101 years old—“distills painting to its purest elements.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: June 12, 2015

Women in the performing arts make waves in this week’s Art Fix Friday. NPR reports that six out of the top ten box-office movies this year featured female protagonists—more than in the last three decades. However, only two films were directed by women. A new study also found that while women direct only 7% of the top-grossing films in Hollywood, they direct 29% of documentaries and 18% of domestic features screened at film festivals.

Although women were outnumbered in headliner spots at this year’s Governors Ball, The New York Times raves that women artists had the strongest and most ambitious performances. Women DJs are still few and far between at music festivals and representation isn’t increasing fast enough.

At this year’s Tony Awards, women brought home trophies in every major category—including big wins for the musical adaptation of Alison Bechdel’s graphic-novel memoir, Fun Home.

Front-Page Femmes

Artist and activist Atena Farghadani was sentenced to over 12 years in an Iranian prison for drawing leaders of parliament as animals.

Famous for her polka-dot artworks and for her psychiatric clinic residence, Yayoi Kusama continues to be a favorite among wealthy art buyers, as well as the public. Last year, she was the most popular artist in terms of exhibition attendance, according to The Art Newspaper.

The Huffington Post covers the feminist music video experiment, “The Weird Girls Project.”

J.K. Rowling’s new novel is already the biggest gainer in sales rank on Amazon.co.uk, shooting up its pre-sales charts only hours after the announcement.

Shows We Want to See

Painter Susan Swartz, whose work NMWA featured in an exhibition in 2011, is featured in a solo exhibition at the Ludwig Museum in Germany.

Exhibitions in New York, London, and Mexico City focus on the life and art of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo.

The Tate Britain has a retrospective of modern sculptor Barbara Hepworth. The Guardian examines key pieces from her 40-year oeuvre.

After years of obscurity, the centenarian artist Carmen Herrera’s paintings are on view at the new Whitney Museum of American Art. Herrera was also included in last month’s New York Times feature on women artists who are finally getting their due.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.