Art Fix Friday: August 19, 2016

Nan Goldin asks, “I’m not responsible for anything like social media, am I? Tell me I’m not.”

The New York Times draws parallels between Goldin’s signature work, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, and the current culture of image sharing.

Front-Page Femmes

Hyperallergic writes, “We should all be inspired by Alma Thomas’s optimism.”

Niki de Saint Phalle’s sculpture garden in Tuscany contains 22 “massive, globular forms of divine goddesses and strange beasts.”

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors, organized by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, will travel to four additional museums in North America. The Art Newspaper and artnet share the excitement.

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo tours Bogotá and her studio for the Guardian.

Polixeni Papapetrou uses flowers from a cemetery to explore themes of mourning and remembrance.

The Brooklyn Museum will celebrate the tenth anniversary of its Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

The Art Newspaper explores Shirin Neshat’s two new video works.

Artsy profiles the Neo Naturists, a “body-painting trio of female flashers” that started an underground art movement in the 1980s.

The Huffington Post shares a list of ten exceptional women photographers.

In LACMA’s new video series, Catherine Opie discusses a painting by Thomas Eakins in the museum’s collection.

Alexandra Berg’s pencil drawings “would fool anyone into thinking they were black and white photographs.”

A new solo exhibition presents three recent bodies of work by Barbara Kasten.

Photographer Lisa Minogue creates stylized portraits of Australian women of color by using vibrant face paint.

In her “Reading Women” series, Carrie Schneider photographs and films women artists reading works by their favorite women authors.

artnet shares five interesting facts about Italian artist and activist Tina Modotti (1896–1942) on the anniversary of her birth.

A rare letter by pioneering travel writer Mary Wortley Montagu goes up for sale.

Lisa Hannigan’s latest album “sneaks up and envelops listeners in cocoons of sound.”

The Guardian discusses revolutionary Australian feminist films of the ’90s.

After her directorial debut, Natalie Portman discusses the status of female directors in Hollywood.

Hyperallergic delves into Chantal Akerman’s 1975 film, Je tu il elle.

Shows We Want to See

Paola Pivi: Ma’am at Dallas Contemporary features Italian artist Paula Pivi’s “multicolored polar bears, an upside down plane, a giant inflatable ladder, and a film of live goldfish on an airplane.”

NPR finds “a brave sense of modernity and freedom” in The Art of Romaine Brooks at Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Eau de Cologne at Sprüth Magers gallery presents works by Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, and Louise Lawler. The exhibition is “rooted in an appreciation for these women who are rare in the field of contemporary art: strident and singular and commercially successful.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: October 9, 2015

Design label Max Mara works with London’s Whitechapel Gallery to give women artists a shot at having their own solo exhibitions. The Max Mara Art Prize for Women enables one artist to have a six-month residency in Italy followed by a major solo exhibition.

Meet the shortlisted artists:

  • Ana Genovés recreates overlooked objects and spaces through architectural installations.
  • To examine landscapes, Tania Kovats creates large-scale installations and time-based works.
  • Emma Hart uses ceramics, video, and photography to explore misrepresentation.
  • Using a range of materials, Phoebe Unwin paints from memory rather than photo references.
  • Ruth Ewan works with archaeologists and horticulturalists to explore radical histories.

Front-Page Femmes

ARTnews gets a sneak-peak into Joan Semmel’s SoHo studio.

Moroccan-born Lalla A. Essaydi combines Islamic calligraphy with representations of the female body.

Evelyn Dunbar, the only woman hired as an Official British War Artist in World War II, gets a retrospective of over 500 paintings and sketches.

The New-York Historical Society plans to open a Center for the Study of Women’s History—spurred by the discovery that some of their collection’s Tiffany lamps were actually made by women.

Juxtapoz shares doll illustrations by Mexican-born artist Hilda Palafox.

Pakistani-born artist Shahzia Sikander’s training in centuries-old Islamic art miniatures influences her hypnotic video installations.

In Central Park, Yoko Ono gathers thousands of people to create a peace sign in memory of John Lennon.

Olga Hirshhorn, collector and widow of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden’s founder, died at age 95.

ArtInfo asks Ishiuchi Miyako about her solo exhibition and how she broke up the boys’ club of Japan’s postwar photography.

Belarusian writer Svetlana Alexievich wins the 2015 Nobel prize in literature for her compilation works exploring history through the emotions of her interviewees.

Rock ‘n’ Roll maven Peggy Jones, also known as “Lady Bo,” died at age 75.

Belgian director Chantal Akerman, known for her introspective feminist films, died at the age of 65.

Marketing efforts for the upcoming film Suffragette receive backlash.

Slate suggests headlining women superheroes for future Marvel movies.

Hawaiian actress Auli’I Cravalho is cast as the voice of Disney’s Moana.

Shows We Want to See

Asia Society Texas Center features mixed-media works by Seoul-based artist Yeesookyung. Known for her “Translated Vase” series, the artist reassembles broken shards to create biomorphic sculptures.

The Grand Palais retrospective of Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun includes a 49-foot-high mirror diffusing a rose-scented fragrance—a reference to the painter’s patron, Marie Antoinette.

Jacqueline Humphries’s “black light” paintings—works that glow with phosphorescent paint—will be on view at the Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.