Art Fix Friday: December 9, 2016

NO MAN’S LAND artist Helen Marten wins the 2016 Turner Prize. Marten also won the inaugural Hepworth Prize for Sculpture this month.

The Guardian and ARTnews discuss Marten’s successes. The London-based sculptor vowed to split the money from both prizes with her fellow nominees. Tate Britain director Alex Farquharson says that Marten’s work “reflects the condition of the world and particularly the condition of the visual world, one that is always accelerating, especially under the influence of the internet.”

Front-Page Femmes

Two-person art collective Soda_Jerk receives the $100,000 Ian Potter Moving Image Commission.

Lorraine O’Grady lip-syncs to Anohni’s “Marrow” in a new music video.

Faith Ringgold says, “You can’t have art of any kind without freedom of speech.”

Palestinian artist Inas Halabi’s award-winning video Mnemosyne features 17 members of her family telling the story of her grandfather’s scar.

A new study finds that “women are consistently earning less than men in the arts.

Dorothea Lange’s censored photographs of Japanese internment camps were largely unseen and unpublished until 2006.

Lydia Polgreen is named editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post.

FKA twigs documents dance workshops she held with 400 dancers from the Baltimore area.

Natalie Frank and Zoe Buckman use politicians’ sexist statements from the last 20 years to make a mural.

A towering cedar sculpture by Ursula von Rydingsvard was blamed for the hospitalization of over a dozen FBI employees, though there is no known evidence to link the two.

Becca Klaver‘s collection of poetry, Empire Wasted, “taps into the current zeitgeist.”

The Creators Project highlights works by women photographers at Art Basel Miami.

The New Yorker highlights Zora Neale Hurston’s life and work.

Emily Dickinson wrote on “scavenged paper: the flap of a manila envelope, the backs of letters, chocolate wrappers, bits of newspaper.”

New works by writers Dava Sobel and Siri Hustvedt “examine how women have succeeded in the arts and sciences, often through channels men weren’t interested in taking.”

Nina Collins publishes a book of short stories written by her late mother, filmmaker Kathleen Collins, titled Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?

Beyoncé is the woman artist with the most Grammy nominations of all time.

Shows We Want to See

The exhibition Beyond Mammy, Jezebel, & Sapphire: Reclaiming Images of Black Women “deconstructs the limiting categorizations mainstream culture allows black women.”

“Sophistical symbol user” Betye Saar showcases assemblages from her 50-year career in Betye Saar: Uneasy Dancer.

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver features more than 60 works by Kim Dickey, including biomorphic objects and ceramic representations of garden mazes. The exhibition “subtly and surprisingly highlights the influence that objects and architecture have in shaping perception,” writes Hyperallergic.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

NO MAN’S LAND: Unexpected Materials

Contemporary large-scale paintings and sculptural hybrids are on view in NO MAN’S LAND: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection. The exhibition imagines a visual conversation between 37 women artists from 15 countries exploring images of the female body and the physical process of making. Helen Marten and Mary Weatherford evoke meaning by juxtaposing unexpected mediums.

What’s On View?

Helen Marten’s Under blossom: B. uses frenzy, 2014

“A lot of people look at my work and think it’s an amalgam of junk, like a granny’s attic,” says Helen Marten (b. 1985, Macclesfield, England). Yet, “All of this stuff is murderously plotted.”

Helen Marten, Under blossom: B. uses frenzy, 2014; Screen-printed suede, leather, waxed cotton, pressed Formica, ash, cherry, walnut, welded galvanized steel, glazed ceramic, strings, cast bronze and aluminum, and colored pencil on paper under resin; Rubell Family Collection, Miami

Helen Marten, Under blossom: B. uses frenzy, 2014; Screen-printed suede, leather, waxed cotton, pressed Formica, ash, cherry, walnut, welded galvanized steel, glazed ceramic, strings, cast bronze and aluminum, and colored pencil on paper under resin; Rubell Family Collection, Miami

Marten’s Under blossom: B. uses frenzy includes a list of materials typical of her meticulously handcrafted assemblages: screen-printed suede, leather and waxed cotton, pressed Formica, ash, cherry, walnut, welded galvanized steel, glazed ceramic, strings, cast bronze and aluminum, and colored pencil on paper under resin.

In the center of this work, Marten printed an image of a skull reliquary layered with drawings of hands in positions suggestive of sign language, mudras, and massage. It also incorporates ceramic vessels and cast metal dishes resembling bird bottles and transmitters. Her pictorial puzzles invite the viewer to tease out new and multiple meanings, sparking associations of communication, connection, and discovery.

Mary Weatherford’s past Sunset, 2015

In contrast to Helen Marten’s enigmatic works made of disparate elements, Mary Weatherford (b. 1963, Ojai, California) works with a sparer set of materials—paint and often neon—to create pieces that reference her experiences.

Mary Weatherford, past Sunset, 2015; Flashe and neon on linen; Rubell Family Collection, Miami

Mary Weatherford, past Sunset, 2015; Flashe and neon on linen; Rubell Family Collection, Miami

Weatherford’s large-scale works are abstracted depictions of places she has seen. past Sunset subtly references landscapes near New York City. She painted with large brushes and sponges to achieve the canvas’s saturated blue-blacks and soft oranges, suggesting a late evening atmosphere.

Describing her use of neon, Weatherford says, “I know if I’m going to put a light on it; I paint it to have something missing . . . I know that the painting is empty and lacking enough that it’s going to need another element. Sometimes I get going, and I think, ‘Wow, that is a painting, and it doesn’t need anything else.’”

Visit the museum and explore NO MAN’S LAND, on view through January 8, 2017.

—Elizabeth Lynch is the editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: September 2, 2016

Last Sunday, more than 700 women artists gathered outside of Hauser Wirth & Schimmel in Los Angeles for a group photo. The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Artsy shared the story. The Art Newspaper called the event a “wake-up call that women artists still have a long way to go. It’s not a question of making history—it’s a question of fighting it.”

Artist Kim Schoenstadt began the project, Now Be Here, by emailing 200 of the city’s artists, who in turn forwarded the email to others. The gathering was, in part, inspired by Hauser Wirth & Schimmel’s current exhibition Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016.

Front-Page Femmes

Frances Morris, the head of Tate Modern, says the art world is “still a boys’ club.”

Hyperallergic examines Betty Tompkins’s “striking and unapologetic” works.

NO MAN’S LAND artist and Turner Prize nominee Helen Marten discusses how her assemblages defy easy categorization.

Hyperallergic discusses the “raw tenderness and explicit sexuality” in Catherine Opie’s intimate photographs.

Multimedia artist Wendy Red Star talks about contemporary Native American art, her artistic practice, and collaborating with her daughter.

As part of Simone Leigh’s The Waiting Room, the Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter collective unites against “institutionalized violence that continues to plague black communities.”

Juxtapoz shares Erika Lizée’s “ominous and mysterious” trompe-l’oeil installation.

Amber Cowan fuses fragments of vintage glass to create complex vessels and sculptures.

“Random items in Fluxus spirit exemplifies that everything is art” in Alison Knowles’s exhibition at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

The Art Newspaper and the Guardian explore Björk’s new exhibition.

In her series “Doubles,” Miranda Barnes explores the friendship between black twin girls.

Olek yarn-bombed a two-story house in Finland with pink crochet.

Costume designer Sandy Powell discusses working with Martin Scorsese, her favorite designs, and her early inspirations.

The New Yorker explores the life and work of piano prodigy Yuja Wang.

Ileana Cabra’s first solo album contains “folk-inspired ballads and infectious Latin jazz standards.”

New Marvel Comics covers show “a diverse field of heroes for the covers.”

Imbolo Mbue’s debut novel, Behold the Dreamers, depicts a “country both blessed and doomed” during the global financial crisis of 2007 and 2008.

The New Yorker shares Bernadette Mayer’s poetry.

NPR shares an interview from October, 2015 with author Gloria Steinem.

Shows We Want to See

Her Crowd: New Art by Women from Our Neighbors’ Private Collections at the Bruce Museum showcases works by established and emerging women artists, including Yayoi Kusama, Kiki Smith, Betye Saar, Dana Schutz, and Tara Donovan.

Visitors wander through a “cardboard labyrinth” to view photographs of hundreds of visitors to the Perth Amboy home in Rachel Harrison’s installation at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

The Norwegian city of Bergen hosts seven exhibitions and events showcasing Lynda Benglis’s works throughout the year.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.