Art Fix Friday: September 9, 2016

A new installation by Liz West floods a long hallway with a series of rainbow-colored, gel-filtered lights.

The project, called Our Colour, is located at this year’s Bristol Biennial. The work changes from a “deep violet to an ecstatic red, allowing one to traverse through an immersive collection of colors.”

Front-Page Femmes

In an interview with JuxtapozNicole Eisenman says, “I like awkward. That feels like a position I occupy a lot of the time.”

Nan Goldin’s work is on display in Inside, an exhibition in Reading prison.

Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter convened in the New Museum’s lobby in response to the institutionalized violence against black lives.

After imagining a woman who could “carry her home on her back and travel anywhere in the world,” Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao designed “dress tents.”

Hyperallergic raves about Jessica Stockholder: The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room.

The Guardian describes comedian Amy Schumer’s The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo as “inspiring.”

Australian artist Joanna Lamb explores the idea of the home and suburbia in her art.

A never-before-published story by Beatrix Potter, called The Tale of Kitty in Boots, has been released.

Female war poets Bejan Matur and Maram al-Masri create a “devastating but richly composed verbal landscape that it is at once epic and intensely human.”

Sabaa Tahir, a former Washington Post editor, writes dystopian fantasies inspired by headlining news.

Jessica Albarn creates electric ink drawings of spiders, crickets, and bumblebees.

“Even if you’re familiar with artist Kara Walker’s signature shadow puppets, you’ve probably never seen them looking as cheerful as they do in electro-pop artist Santigold’s new music video,” writes Hyperallergic.

Broadly explores the challenges for women hoping to succeed in the Cantonese pop music industry.

Actress Sarah Paulson discusses her role as Marcia Clark in the television series The People v. O.J. Simpson.

The Alice Initiative could help promising female directors. Forty anonymous film executives curated a list of emerging women directors to “push inclusion forward behind the cameras.”

Director Ava DuVernay talks about her work on Queen Sugar and says, “It’s important for us to really interrogate the meaning of black lives by watching black lives unfold in a way that’s unhurried, that’s purposeful, that’s intentional.”

Shows We Want to See

More than 40 drawings by Maggi Hambling are on display at London’s British Museum. In an interview with the Telegraph, Hambling says, “Great art inhabits that territory where life and death cohabit.”

Françoise Grossen Selects at the Museum of Arts and Design features “large-scale, suspended rope forms constructed of knots, loops, braids, and twists.”

Hyperallergic describes the work in We Run Things as “inventive, expressionistic figuration that is approached in a unique fashion by each artist.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: January 1, 2016

The Telegraph examines the status of women in the art world. Although women have made strides with high-profile museum exhibitions in the last year, there is still a huge price gap. Bonhams reports that only 19 of the top 500 artists sold by value last year were women—showing how women artists are “woefully undervalued.”

Although Georgia O’Keeffe broke the record for a price at auction by a woman artist, she still does not come close to the latest record-setting work by a male artist. This year, Picasso’s Les Femme d’Alger (Version “0”) earned a $179 million price tag at auction.

Front-Page Femmes

Police denied permission for an exhibition of Mathilde Grafström’s photographs of nudes to be shown in Copenhagen’s Nytorv square on the grounds that they are “indecent.”

The Boston Globe highlights the city’s successful public displays of art by women in 2015, including works by Janet Echelman, Joan Jonas, Helen Frankenthaler—among others.

Broadly examines the theme of revenge in paintings by 17th-century artist Artemisia Gentileschi.

Pastel artist Zaria Forman honors her mother’s memory and raises awareness about climate change through large-scale Arctic seascapes.

Artslant shares its favorite interviews from 2015, including discussions with artists Cecily Brown, Hito Steyerl, Lesley Dill, Martine Syms, Laure Prouvost, and Zina Saro-Wiwa, and Frances Stark.

Artinfo highlights the promotion of women artists in 2015.

The Independent profiles 70-year-old Maggi Hambling—one of Britain’s most celebrated contemporary artists—who says, “You can still say something with oil paint that you can’t with photography or film.”

Mic features 13 feminist Tumblr artists who turned their blogs into online galleries.

Women in the music world broke records in 2015.

The Guardian describes Star Wars: The Force Awakens as “the feminist punch-the-air moment we’ve all been desperately waiting for.”

The Atlantic describes popular novels that feature “ill-natured, brilliantly flawed female protagonists,” illustrating that female characters do not have to be likable.

Dakotah storyteller Mary Louise Defender Wilson won a $50,000 United States Artist Fellowship.

Shows We Want to See

LoudArt in the Saudi Arabian city of Jeddah covers “controversial themes such as gender issues, freedom and an identity crisis.” Led by curator Raneen Farid Bukhari, the event “reflects the efforts by young Saudi women to expand their role in public life.”

Hyperallergic instructs visitors to get caught up in the “mathematics of identity, in the rights and wrongs of the art world, and in the aesthetics of documentation as art” in the exhibition Lorraine O’Grady: Where Margins Become Centers. The exhibition features photography, film, collage, performance documentation, and writing.

Surfacing at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum will include two temporary “escapist” exhibits that spotlight water-themed works by painter Samantha French and photographer Rhea Pappas.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.