Art Fix Friday: September 9, 2016

A new installation by Liz West floods a long hallway with a series of rainbow-colored, gel-filtered lights.

The project, called Our Colour, is located at this year’s Bristol Biennial. The work changes from a “deep violet to an ecstatic red, allowing one to traverse through an immersive collection of colors.”

Front-Page Femmes

In an interview with JuxtapozNicole Eisenman says, “I like awkward. That feels like a position I occupy a lot of the time.”

Nan Goldin’s work is on display in Inside, an exhibition in Reading prison.

Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter convened in the New Museum’s lobby in response to the institutionalized violence against black lives.

After imagining a woman who could “carry her home on her back and travel anywhere in the world,” Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao designed “dress tents.”

Hyperallergic raves about Jessica Stockholder: The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room.

The Guardian describes comedian Amy Schumer’s The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo as “inspiring.”

Australian artist Joanna Lamb explores the idea of the home and suburbia in her art.

A never-before-published story by Beatrix Potter, called The Tale of Kitty in Boots, has been released.

Female war poets Bejan Matur and Maram al-Masri create a “devastating but richly composed verbal landscape that it is at once epic and intensely human.”

Sabaa Tahir, a former Washington Post editor, writes dystopian fantasies inspired by headlining news.

Jessica Albarn creates electric ink drawings of spiders, crickets, and bumblebees.

“Even if you’re familiar with artist Kara Walker’s signature shadow puppets, you’ve probably never seen them looking as cheerful as they do in electro-pop artist Santigold’s new music video,” writes Hyperallergic.

Broadly explores the challenges for women hoping to succeed in the Cantonese pop music industry.

Actress Sarah Paulson discusses her role as Marcia Clark in the television series The People v. O.J. Simpson.

The Alice Initiative could help promising female directors. Forty anonymous film executives curated a list of emerging women directors to “push inclusion forward behind the cameras.”

Director Ava DuVernay talks about her work on Queen Sugar and says, “It’s important for us to really interrogate the meaning of black lives by watching black lives unfold in a way that’s unhurried, that’s purposeful, that’s intentional.”

Shows We Want to See

More than 40 drawings by Maggi Hambling are on display at London’s British Museum. In an interview with the Telegraph, Hambling says, “Great art inhabits that territory where life and death cohabit.”

Françoise Grossen Selects at the Museum of Arts and Design features “large-scale, suspended rope forms constructed of knots, loops, braids, and twists.”

Hyperallergic describes the work in We Run Things as “inventive, expressionistic figuration that is approached in a unique fashion by each artist.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: August 19, 2016

Nan Goldin asks, “I’m not responsible for anything like social media, am I? Tell me I’m not.”

The New York Times draws parallels between Goldin’s signature work, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, and the current culture of image sharing.

Front-Page Femmes

Hyperallergic writes, “We should all be inspired by Alma Thomas’s optimism.”

Niki de Saint Phalle’s sculpture garden in Tuscany contains 22 “massive, globular forms of divine goddesses and strange beasts.”

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors, organized by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, will travel to four additional museums in North America. The Art Newspaper and artnet share the excitement.

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo tours Bogotá and her studio for the Guardian.

Polixeni Papapetrou uses flowers from a cemetery to explore themes of mourning and remembrance.

The Brooklyn Museum will celebrate the tenth anniversary of its Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

The Art Newspaper explores Shirin Neshat’s two new video works.

Artsy profiles the Neo Naturists, a “body-painting trio of female flashers” that started an underground art movement in the 1980s.

The Huffington Post shares a list of ten exceptional women photographers.

In LACMA’s new video series, Catherine Opie discusses a painting by Thomas Eakins in the museum’s collection.

Alexandra Berg’s pencil drawings “would fool anyone into thinking they were black and white photographs.”

A new solo exhibition presents three recent bodies of work by Barbara Kasten.

Photographer Lisa Minogue creates stylized portraits of Australian women of color by using vibrant face paint.

In her “Reading Women” series, Carrie Schneider photographs and films women artists reading works by their favorite women authors.

artnet shares five interesting facts about Italian artist and activist Tina Modotti (1896–1942) on the anniversary of her birth.

A rare letter by pioneering travel writer Mary Wortley Montagu goes up for sale.

Lisa Hannigan’s latest album “sneaks up and envelops listeners in cocoons of sound.”

The Guardian discusses revolutionary Australian feminist films of the ’90s.

After her directorial debut, Natalie Portman discusses the status of female directors in Hollywood.

Hyperallergic delves into Chantal Akerman’s 1975 film, Je tu il elle.

Shows We Want to See

Paola Pivi: Ma’am at Dallas Contemporary features Italian artist Paula Pivi’s “multicolored polar bears, an upside down plane, a giant inflatable ladder, and a film of live goldfish on an airplane.”

NPR finds “a brave sense of modernity and freedom” in The Art of Romaine Brooks at Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Eau de Cologne at Sprüth Magers gallery presents works by Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, and Louise Lawler. The exhibition is “rooted in an appreciation for these women who are rare in the field of contemporary art: strident and singular and commercially successful.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.