Art Fix Friday: September 9, 2016

A new installation by Liz West floods a long hallway with a series of rainbow-colored, gel-filtered lights.

The project, called Our Colour, is located at this year’s Bristol Biennial. The work changes from a “deep violet to an ecstatic red, allowing one to traverse through an immersive collection of colors.”

Front-Page Femmes

In an interview with JuxtapozNicole Eisenman says, “I like awkward. That feels like a position I occupy a lot of the time.”

Nan Goldin’s work is on display in Inside, an exhibition in Reading prison.

Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter convened in the New Museum’s lobby in response to the institutionalized violence against black lives.

After imagining a woman who could “carry her home on her back and travel anywhere in the world,” Robin Lasser and Adrienne Pao designed “dress tents.”

Hyperallergic raves about Jessica Stockholder: The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room.

The Guardian describes comedian Amy Schumer’s The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo as “inspiring.”

Australian artist Joanna Lamb explores the idea of the home and suburbia in her art.

A never-before-published story by Beatrix Potter, called The Tale of Kitty in Boots, has been released.

Female war poets Bejan Matur and Maram al-Masri create a “devastating but richly composed verbal landscape that it is at once epic and intensely human.”

Sabaa Tahir, a former Washington Post editor, writes dystopian fantasies inspired by headlining news.

Jessica Albarn creates electric ink drawings of spiders, crickets, and bumblebees.

“Even if you’re familiar with artist Kara Walker’s signature shadow puppets, you’ve probably never seen them looking as cheerful as they do in electro-pop artist Santigold’s new music video,” writes Hyperallergic.

Broadly explores the challenges for women hoping to succeed in the Cantonese pop music industry.

Actress Sarah Paulson discusses her role as Marcia Clark in the television series The People v. O.J. Simpson.

The Alice Initiative could help promising female directors. Forty anonymous film executives curated a list of emerging women directors to “push inclusion forward behind the cameras.”

Director Ava DuVernay talks about her work on Queen Sugar and says, “It’s important for us to really interrogate the meaning of black lives by watching black lives unfold in a way that’s unhurried, that’s purposeful, that’s intentional.”

Shows We Want to See

More than 40 drawings by Maggi Hambling are on display at London’s British Museum. In an interview with the Telegraph, Hambling says, “Great art inhabits that territory where life and death cohabit.”

Françoise Grossen Selects at the Museum of Arts and Design features “large-scale, suspended rope forms constructed of knots, loops, braids, and twists.”

Hyperallergic describes the work in We Run Things as “inventive, expressionistic figuration that is approached in a unique fashion by each artist.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: August 5, 2016

Alma Thomas at the Studio Museum in Harlem continues to make headlines. A painting in NMWA’s collection, Iris, Tulips, Jonquils, and Crocuses, is on view in the exhibition.

Thomas had “one of the great, late-blooming careers in American art during the post-World War II era,” writes the New York Times. At the age of 80, Alma Thomas became the first African American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Front-Page Femmes

Photographer Kathy Shorr documents the scars of survivors of gun violence.

Lucy Sparrow’s first installation in New York will be a corner shop where people can browse 8,000 items—all hand-sewn from felt and available for purchase.

Rebecca Louise Law re-creates Dutch still-life paintings as 3-D sculptures and photographs their decay over time.

Mariko Mori discusses her translucent ring sculpture, sponsored by the Olympics and mounted above a waterfall in Rio de Janerio.

Juxtapoz shares South African artist Barbara Wildenboer’s book sculptures.

Turkish painter and journalist Zehra Doğan was detained in Turkey after the failed military coup.

Feminist Avant Garde of the 1970s comprises over 150 works by 48 international female artists.

artnet shares seven facts about Abstract Expressionist painter Hedda Sterne (1910–2011).

Artsy discusses the forgotten legacy of Beatrice Wood.

Ten paintings of Brandi Twilley’s childhood home in Oklahoma, which burnt down in 1999, comprise the exhibition The Living Room.

ArtInfo shares Marina Abramović’s 1975 film Art Must Be Beautiful, Artist Must Be Beautiful.

This summer, New York-based painter Nicole Eisenman will occupy a workshop on the Greek island of Hydra.

Comedian Ali Wong discusses her first comedy special, filming while pregnant, and female comics.

Hyperallergic asks Elizabeth Sackler about the Sackler Center First Award, Angela Davis, and mass incarceration.

Heather Headley returns to Broadway after 15 years in a revival of The Color Purple.

A new book about Agnes Martin emphasizes the importance of the artist’s early works.

Jesmyn Ward invited prominent writers and thinkers to reflect on black life in America and contribute to her essay collection The Fire This Time.

Cate Blanchett will perform 13 separate roles in German cinematographer and video artist Julian Rosefeldt’s film installation Manifesto.

Ava DuVernay will direct the film adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time—making her the first woman of color to direct a film with a $100 million budget.

Alice in Black and White explores the life of photographer Alice Austen (1866–1952), including her relationship with Gertrude Tate.

Shows We Want to See

Anicka Yi, whose work will be on view in NO MAN’S LAND: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection, presents new work in Germany.

She: International Women Artists Exhibition, on view at the Long Museum in Shanghai, features 108 works by 100 female artists from 13 countries. The Art Newspaper reports that the exhibition’s four sections span ten centuries.

Nancy Mitchnick’s exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit features oil paintings of landscapes and post-industrial Detroit that Hyperallergic says “ricochet out into the real world, conveying a sense of how a place looks based on how it feels.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: October 2, 2015

The MacArthur Fellows Program announced the 24 individuals awarded “genius grants” this year—including nine women. Two prominent U.S. artists, Nicole Eisenman and LaToya Ruby Frazier, received $625,000 in funding over five years.

NPR spoke with Frazier about her work exploring the collapse of the steel industry in her hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania. Retelling the town’s history through photos of her own family, Frazier reveals the roles of African-Americans in Braddock’s industry, which had been “overlooked and ignored and erased from the history pages.” As a call for social justice, her work serves as a “human document” of the injustices faced by the working class.

Front-Page Femmes

Moa Karlberg photographs women’s faces in Sweden and Tanzania during the final stages of giving birth.

ARTINFO interviews Tania Bruguera about her new project, The Francis Effect, which confronts issues of immigration by appealing to the pope.

Jerry Saltz asks, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Bad-Boy Artists?” In this Vulture article, Saltz explains that “the art world has never really known what to do with them, mostly responding from fear.”

Flutist Clare Chase “is a model for a new generation of American classical musicians,” writes The New Yorker.

Sound artist Christine Sun Kim rethinks definitions of sound and silence.

A new project invites contemporary women artists to imagine the narratives and voices of characters in Western art’s recurring images of women reading.

International art curator Koyo Kouoh discusses contemporary African Art and the “invisible boundary” of the Sahara.

Hillary Clinton made a “girl power” Spotify playlist. Slate lists more empowering songs by women artists.

Nancy Meyers’s The Intern gets dismissed by male critics as a “chick flick.” The Guardian says, “It’s not unusual for [female filmmakers’] work to receive unduly harsh criticism.”

Screenwriter Julia Hart discusses her work in the feminist Western film, The Keeping Room. Hart enjoys taking “classic tropes that have been dominated by men and turning them around and making them female.”

The Women’s List is an oral history of 50 years of women’s equality told through 15 trailblazing women.

Author Julie Schumacher becomes the first woman to win the Thurber prize for humor writing.

Singer and model Grace Jones releases her memoir, I’ll Never Write My Memoirs.

Margaret Atwood’s The Heart Goes Last is a strange version of reality.

New York Magazine shares words of wisdom by 25 famous women writers.

Shows We Want to See

Covered in Time and History: The Films of Ana Mendieta investigates the mostly-forgotten films of the multi-talented feminist artist. artnet says the exhibition “remedies this fractured past, so that the artist can be more than her tragedy.”

Including over 90 works, The Indestructible Lee Miller reveals how Miller’s experience as a model for Vogue and Man Ray influenced her photography.

Mexican Photography: Women Pioneers includes photos from “some of Mexico’s most celebrated photographers, though most are not famous outside the art world.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.