Art Fix Friday: August 19, 2016

Nan Goldin asks, “I’m not responsible for anything like social media, am I? Tell me I’m not.”

The New York Times draws parallels between Goldin’s signature work, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, and the current culture of image sharing.

Front-Page Femmes

Hyperallergic writes, “We should all be inspired by Alma Thomas’s optimism.”

Niki de Saint Phalle’s sculpture garden in Tuscany contains 22 “massive, globular forms of divine goddesses and strange beasts.”

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors, organized by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, will travel to four additional museums in North America. The Art Newspaper and artnet share the excitement.

Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo tours Bogotá and her studio for the Guardian.

Polixeni Papapetrou uses flowers from a cemetery to explore themes of mourning and remembrance.

The Brooklyn Museum will celebrate the tenth anniversary of its Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

The Art Newspaper explores Shirin Neshat’s two new video works.

Artsy profiles the Neo Naturists, a “body-painting trio of female flashers” that started an underground art movement in the 1980s.

The Huffington Post shares a list of ten exceptional women photographers.

In LACMA’s new video series, Catherine Opie discusses a painting by Thomas Eakins in the museum’s collection.

Alexandra Berg’s pencil drawings “would fool anyone into thinking they were black and white photographs.”

A new solo exhibition presents three recent bodies of work by Barbara Kasten.

Photographer Lisa Minogue creates stylized portraits of Australian women of color by using vibrant face paint.

In her “Reading Women” series, Carrie Schneider photographs and films women artists reading works by their favorite women authors.

artnet shares five interesting facts about Italian artist and activist Tina Modotti (1896–1942) on the anniversary of her birth.

A rare letter by pioneering travel writer Mary Wortley Montagu goes up for sale.

Lisa Hannigan’s latest album “sneaks up and envelops listeners in cocoons of sound.”

The Guardian discusses revolutionary Australian feminist films of the ’90s.

After her directorial debut, Natalie Portman discusses the status of female directors in Hollywood.

Hyperallergic delves into Chantal Akerman’s 1975 film, Je tu il elle.

Shows We Want to See

Paola Pivi: Ma’am at Dallas Contemporary features Italian artist Paula Pivi’s “multicolored polar bears, an upside down plane, a giant inflatable ladder, and a film of live goldfish on an airplane.”

NPR finds “a brave sense of modernity and freedom” in The Art of Romaine Brooks at Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Eau de Cologne at Sprüth Magers gallery presents works by Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Rosemarie Trockel, and Louise Lawler. The exhibition is “rooted in an appreciation for these women who are rare in the field of contemporary art: strident and singular and commercially successful.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: June 17, 2016

Artsy profiles 20 early or mid-career female figurative painters who are “creating inspiring figurative paintings that speak to the present, and offer glimpses into the future.” The list includes NO MAN’S LAND artists Nina Chanel Abney, Hayv Kahraman, and Mira Dancy—as well as NMWA artist Amy Sherald.

Abney’s work “swiftly tackle topics related to race, gender, and politics.” Artsy writes that “a critical mass of female painters are embracing figuration, diversifying it, and pushing the conversation around it forward.”

Front-Page Femmes

“Just Me and Allah,” a photographic series by Samra Habib—a queer Muslim photographer—shares the stories of LBGT Muslims.

Activist groups protest Tate Modern’s new building for the exclusion of works by Ana Mendieta.

Painter Françoise Gilot—now 94 years old—discusses her past with Picasso, her career, and her attempts to buy back her paintings.

Juxtapoz features Brooklyn-based photographer Janelle Jones’s vibrant, candy-colored still-lifes.

Chinese artist Cao Fei is the youngest artist ever selected to create a BMW Art Car.

Yayoi Kusama–In Infinity is the first exhibition to highlight the Japanese artist’s interest in fashion and design.

Artforum shares “A Feminist Guide to Surviving the Art World,” highlighting works by prominent feminist artists.

For her “social sculpture” project, Percent for Green, Alicia Grullón conducts environmental justice workshops, providing a proposal for legislation.

Andra Ursuta’s Alps sculpture resembles a climbing wall—but with penis-shaped holds.

Mika Tajima’s temporary public art project is a hot pink hot tub that releases “techni-color clouds.”

Multidisciplinary artist Ciriza’s work “evokes the slow shedding of human hair and snake skin.”

Xiomara Reyes will become the new director of the Washington School of Ballet.

Teen thriller author Lois Duncan died at the age of 82.

The Atlantic explores how a short-lived 1908s spinoff series, She-Ra, offered an alternative to the male-dominated cartoon world.

Comedian Tig Notaro released her memoir, I’m Just A Person.

The Guardian interviews “punk-poet genius” Patti Smith.

The New Yorker writes that rocker Mitski Miyawaki’s lyrics “invite close readings, examinations that reveal submerged meanings.”

The Los Angeles Times raves about two murals featured in Cindy Sherman: Imitation of Life.

The Atlantic delves into the why Hollywood doesn’t tell more stories for and about girls.

AIGA explores design house Marimekko’s history of being “made for women and run by women”—and how 94% of its employees are women.

Shows We Want to See

Hyperallergic examines (left) and Georgia O'Keefe’s watercolors (right)

Hyperallergic examines Adriana Varejão’s portraits (left) and Georgia O’Keeffe’s watercolors (right)

In Kindred Spirits, Adriana Varejão encourages visitors to guess which portraits are images of native people and which are versions of modernist designs.

Georgia O’Keeffe’s Far Wide Texas examines 51 watercolor paintings O’Keeffe made during her two years teaching in Texas.

Women of Abstract Expressionism at the Denver Art Museum aims to correct the history of the male-dominated art movement. Vogue and the Denver Post interviewed the exhibition’s curator.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum opens The Art of Romaine Brooks.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.